Najran governor launches first phase of Saudi project to restore wildlife in reserve

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Najran Gov. Prince Jalawi bin Abdul Aziz released a group of Arabian oryxes, goitered gazelles, Edmi antelopes, houbaras, and ostriches. It is the first phase of the largest project to restore wildlife since establishing the Saudi Wildlife Commission 30 years ago. (SPA)
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Najran Gov. Prince Jalawi bin Abdul Aziz released a group of Arabian oryxes, goitered gazelles, Edmi antelopes, houbaras, and ostriches. It is the first phase of the largest project to restore wildlife since establishing the Saudi Wildlife Commission 30 years ago. (SPA)
Updated 08 February 2018
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Najran governor launches first phase of Saudi project to restore wildlife in reserve

NAJRAN: Najran Gov. Prince Jalawi bin Abdul Aziz has launched a project on Thursday to restore wildlife in the Uruq Bani Ma’arid Reserve.
He said during the launch: “We live among the efforts to preserve and develop wildlife, both animal and plant life; we look at the grace and security that God had granted us, so we are sparing no effort to protect the animals and plants in a disturbed region, where some of its areas are witnessing the most cruel images of abuse of man and humanity, and a violation of religion, soul, mind, honor and money.”
Prince Jalawi stressed the importance of the achievements of the Saudi Wildlife Commission, which attempts to overcome all obstacles to confront imminent dangers and restore the ecological balance.
He released a group of Arabian oryxes, goitered gazelles, Edmi antelopes, houbaras, and ostriches. It is the first phase of the largest project to restore wildlife since establishing the Saudi Wildlife Commission 30 years ago.
The vice president of the commission, Dr. Hani Tatwani, said that the commission aims to enhance its role in developing and executing plans to confront the dangers facing wildlife, both in the sea and on land. It also endeavors to rehabilitate the near-extinct species and those which are endangered.
There will be restoration of wildlife in five different reserves in Harra Al-Harra, Khanafah, Al Tabiq, Taysiyya, and Awal.
At the end of the launch, the Saudi Wildlife Commission staged three presentations about the King Khaled Wildlife Research Center in Thamamah.
Najran Gov. Prince Jalawi bin Abdul Aziz released a group of Arabian oryxes, goitered gazelles, Edmi antelopes, houbaras, and ostriches. It is the first phase of the largest project to restore wildlife since establishing the Saudi Wildlife Commission 30 years ago. (SPA)
 
Najran Gov. Prince Jalawi bin Abdul Aziz released a group of Arabian oryxes, goitered gazelles, Edmi antelopes, houbaras, and ostriches. It is the first phase of the largest project to restore wildlife since establishing the Saudi Wildlife Commission 30 years ago. (SPA)


Saudi Vision 2030 ‘will boost competitiveness,’ WEF says

Updated 15 August 2018
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Saudi Vision 2030 ‘will boost competitiveness,’ WEF says

  • Many young Arabs who dream of living and working in Europe are not only interested in earning better incomes
  • To maintain our identity, we need to modernize our work environment

LONDON: Countries across the Middle East are struggling to create diverse opportunities for their youth, according to the latest World Economic Forum (WEF) Arab World Competitiveness Report.
However, a number of countries are innovating and creating new solutions to previously existing barriers to competitiveness, the report noted.
Saudi Arabia has committed to significant changes to its economy and society as part of its Vision 2030 reform plan, while the UAE has increased equity investment in technology firms from $100 million to $1.7 billion in just two years.
Bahrain is piloting a new flexi-permit for foreign workers to go beyond the usual sponsorship system that has segmented and created inefficiencies in the labor market of most GCC countries.
The report found that, despite huge improvements in infrastructure and technology adoption, government-led investment in the Arab world has not been sufficient to encourage private sector participation on a wide scale.
The WEF report, written in conjunction with the World Bank Group, outlines recommendations for Arab countries to prepare for a new economic context, better education opportunities and increased social mobility.
“We hope that the 2018 Arab World Competitiveness Report will stimulate discussions resulting in government reforms that could unlock the entrepreneurial potential of the region and its youth,” said Philippe Le Houérou, IFC’s CEO.
“We must accelerate progress toward an innovation-driven economic model that creates productive jobs and widespread opportunities.”
The report states that the way toward less oil-dependent economies for the Arab region is through robust macroeconomic policies that facilitate investment and trade, promotion of exports, improvements in education and initiatives to increase innovation among firms.