Najran governor launches first phase of Saudi project to restore wildlife in reserve

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Najran Gov. Prince Jalawi bin Abdul Aziz released a group of Arabian oryxes, goitered gazelles, Edmi antelopes, houbaras, and ostriches. It is the first phase of the largest project to restore wildlife since establishing the Saudi Wildlife Commission 30 years ago. (SPA)
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Najran Gov. Prince Jalawi bin Abdul Aziz released a group of Arabian oryxes, goitered gazelles, Edmi antelopes, houbaras, and ostriches. It is the first phase of the largest project to restore wildlife since establishing the Saudi Wildlife Commission 30 years ago. (SPA)
Updated 08 February 2018
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Najran governor launches first phase of Saudi project to restore wildlife in reserve

NAJRAN: Najran Gov. Prince Jalawi bin Abdul Aziz has launched a project on Thursday to restore wildlife in the Uruq Bani Ma’arid Reserve.
He said during the launch: “We live among the efforts to preserve and develop wildlife, both animal and plant life; we look at the grace and security that God had granted us, so we are sparing no effort to protect the animals and plants in a disturbed region, where some of its areas are witnessing the most cruel images of abuse of man and humanity, and a violation of religion, soul, mind, honor and money.”
Prince Jalawi stressed the importance of the achievements of the Saudi Wildlife Commission, which attempts to overcome all obstacles to confront imminent dangers and restore the ecological balance.
He released a group of Arabian oryxes, goitered gazelles, Edmi antelopes, houbaras, and ostriches. It is the first phase of the largest project to restore wildlife since establishing the Saudi Wildlife Commission 30 years ago.
The vice president of the commission, Dr. Hani Tatwani, said that the commission aims to enhance its role in developing and executing plans to confront the dangers facing wildlife, both in the sea and on land. It also endeavors to rehabilitate the near-extinct species and those which are endangered.
There will be restoration of wildlife in five different reserves in Harra Al-Harra, Khanafah, Al Tabiq, Taysiyya, and Awal.
At the end of the launch, the Saudi Wildlife Commission staged three presentations about the King Khaled Wildlife Research Center in Thamamah.
Najran Gov. Prince Jalawi bin Abdul Aziz released a group of Arabian oryxes, goitered gazelles, Edmi antelopes, houbaras, and ostriches. It is the first phase of the largest project to restore wildlife since establishing the Saudi Wildlife Commission 30 years ago. (SPA)
 
Najran Gov. Prince Jalawi bin Abdul Aziz released a group of Arabian oryxes, goitered gazelles, Edmi antelopes, houbaras, and ostriches. It is the first phase of the largest project to restore wildlife since establishing the Saudi Wildlife Commission 30 years ago. (SPA)


Perpetrators of violence against civilians should be held accountable: Saudi envoy

Children attending an open-air Arabic school in February at Kutupalong refugee camp, where they were learning to read the Qur’an. (Reuters)
Updated 24 May 2018
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Perpetrators of violence against civilians should be held accountable: Saudi envoy

  • Al-Mouallimi: International law and Islamic principles are being violated with impunity
  • In Yemen, abuses against civilians by Iran-backed Houthi militias include the recruitment of children, the planting of mines in civilian neighborhoods and the use of human shields, said Saudi Arabia's top diplomat at the UN

JEDDAH: Perpetrators of violence against civilians should be held accountable and punished for their crimes, the Saudi ambassador to the UN, Abdallah Al-Mouallimi, told the Security Council on Tuesday.

International law and Islamic principles are being violated with impunity, he added. “We witnessed a new massacre committed by Israeli occupation forces in Gaza, which killed dozens of Palestinian martyrs and wounded thousands,” he said. 

“And for seven consecutive years, the world has witnessed bloodletting in Syria, which killed hundreds of thousands of innocent civilians using various means,” including “genocide,” he added. 

“In Myanmar, the world is watching as hundreds of thousands of Muslim Rohingya are driven out of their homes that are burnt, their women raped and children displaced.”

In Yemen, abuses against civilians by Iran-backed Houthi militias include the recruitment of children, the planting of mines in civilian neighborhoods and the use of human shields, Al-Mouallimi said. 

He cited the example of four-year-old Jamila, who had been used as a human shield. She was saved by Saudi-led coalition forces and handed over to her family.

Saudi Arabia supports the formation of a committee of inquiry into Israel’s crimes in Gaza, and a mechanism to collect documents and evidence to hold perpetrators of war crimes in Syria accountable, Al-Mouallimi said.

He stressed the need to facilitate the return of Rohingya refugees to Myanmar in a safe, dignified and voluntary way, and to hold accountable those who caused them harm.