Whistle launches Spring Summer 2018 collection

Whistles showroom
Updated 08 February 2018
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Whistle launches Spring Summer 2018 collection

A wardrobe fit for an adventure comes to Whistles this spring — with travel at the heart of the collection. France is a source of inspiration — both Paris and the wilds of the French coastline — fed into pieces with a certain “je ne sais quoi.” The collection features oversized striped blouses, Seine wide-legged pants and a reworked Breton.
Silhouettes are loose and free-flowing, keeping things cool in both senses of the word. A classic blazer and oversized boilersuit are work-ready in an effortless way, best worn with “don’t-care hair.” Tie-front striped skirts, raffia bags and easy chic parkas provide the kind of off-duty insouciance that speaks of seaside living on the continent. “At Whistles, we say Vive Les Vacances and this season’s slogan tote bag make our feelings known. We dress to frill too — pretty flounces are beguiling over dresses and jumpsuits,” a press release said.
Print is part of the brand’s DNA and this season it is graphic, with the kind of luscious, vivid colors found in African countries. A tulip print is scattered across classic jumpsuits — in a wide-legged shape, cropped or strapless — or on chiffon asymmetric-hemmed dresses, with cut-out detailing on the shoulder. Turquoise is a color of the season — on vintage-looking prints worked into midi-dresses and wrap-around blouses that tie things up just so. A cropped white jacket is the stealth outerwear game changer for spring.
For a new take on a summer palette, the store has sun-bleached colors that signal long languid days. A barley-colored suede jumpsuit provides an easy impact and a wide-sleeved sand-colored denim jacket has an artist-in-the-studio feel. Blush-colored flared jeans feel romantic when paired with a tie-back blouse covered with floral print.


J-PAL boosts refugee education

Updated 20 May 2018
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J-PAL boosts refugee education

The Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is launching a new scheme to help refugees access higher education in development economics. 

The goal of this new collaboration is to empower refugees through training that will enable them to leverage their local knowledge, build their technical skills, and become experts in the fields of development economics and public policy. 

Starting in the summer of 2018, J-PAL is teaming up with MIT’s Refugee Action (ReACT) initiative to provide access for selected refugees to the online MicroMasters program in Data, Economics and Development Policy (DEDP) offered by J-PAL and MIT’s Department of Economics. ReACT, which aims to connect refugees with higher education, will sponsor selected learners and provide access to five online MicroMasters DEDP courses on development economics; in-person workshops on business skills, and paid internships to put their skills into practice. 

Hassan Jameel, president of Community Jameel Saudi Arabia, said: “Education and learning are fundamental to a strong society, and providing access to MIT’s MicroMasters is a foundation upon which to rebuild the disrupted education and careers of refugees worldwide. 

“Building on computer science and entrepreneurship support for refugees in Jordan, this collaborative effort between J-PAL, MIT and ReACT creates another bespoke learning opportunity for refugees, opening doors and knocking down barriers to higher education for learners.” 

A MicroMasters is a professional and academic credential, accredited by MITx, MIT’s online learning platform, and offers individuals a route to applying for a full master’s degree program at MIT or other universities. 

The new initiative uses a carefully crafted model of blended learning — with financial support for online courses and in-person workshops, as well as strong emphasis on community building — to specifically target and overcome the educational challenges facing refugees. This track within ReACT aims to provide refugees with the tools they need to engage as technical experts with the problems facing their communities.