Egypt's ex-auditor feared same fate as slain Italian scholar

Hesham Genena, Egypt’s former top auditor who suffered serious injuries during an apparent kidnapping attempt, during an interview with the Associated Press at his home in Cairo, Egypt. (AP/Amr Nabil)
Updated 08 February 2018
0

Egypt's ex-auditor feared same fate as slain Italian scholar

CAIRO: Egypt's former top auditor who was seriously injured in an apparent kidnapping attempt says he feared he'd meet a fate similar to that of an Italian student who was killed and whose badly tortured body was dumped in the desert near Cairo in 2016.
Hesham Genena suggested his assailants were linked to the government and said police denied him medical attention for hours after the attack outside his home.
Genena led Egypt's watchdog agency until President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi fired him in 2016, following an investigation that concluded he had misled the public on the issue of corruption.
He spoke to The Associated Press late Wednesday.
Genena says: "I could have just been found dead in the desert like (Giulio) Regeni."
Regeni's brutal death triggered a crisis between Egypt and Italy.


Egypt arrests 24 in demolition protests near pyramids

Updated 3 min 55 sec ago
0

Egypt arrests 24 in demolition protests near pyramids

  • Police used tear gas to disperse residents and shopkeepers in the Nazlet el-Samman village
  • Residents reportedly scuffled with police escorting the demolition workers

CAIRO: Egyptian security officials say police have arrested 24 people who tried to prevent authorities from demolishing illegal buildings near the Giza pyramids.
They say police used tear gas to disperse residents and shopkeepers in the Nazlet el-Samman village on Monday after they scuffled with police escorting the demolition workers.
The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to brief the media.
Monday’s violence follows a recent announcement that a private Egyptian company will take charge of running the historical site that includes the Great Pyramid and the Sphinx, which are visited by millions every year.
Many of the village’s residents make a living off visitors, hawking souvenirs and offering horse rides. Tourists have long complained of being harassed or overcharged.