Gold hits four-week low on firmer dollar amid US rate hike forecasts

An employee sorts gold bars in this file photo. (Reuters)
Updated 08 February 2018
0

Gold hits four-week low on firmer dollar amid US rate hike forecasts

LONDON: Gold prices dropped for a third straight session on Thursday and hit a fresh four-week low as investors liquidated their long positions on a firmer dollar, while expectations of more US rate hikes this year also weighed on the market.
Spot gold was down 0.4 percent at $1,312.41 per ounce, after hitting its lowest since Jan. 10 at $1,309.51 earlier in the session. US gold futures for April delivery were nearly flat at $1,314.50 per ounce.
The dollar rose on Wednesday, marking its biggest one-day gain in more than three months against a basket of currencies. It was steady at 90.269 on Thursday.
“There was consistent selling on Comex ... and offers above the $1,320 cash level were enough to prevent an advance,” said MKS PAMP Group trader Alex Thorndike.
“Spot gold slowly began to work its way lower with ongoing liquidation seen from managed money and leveraged clients — those who were still buying aggressively above $1,340.”
Asian shares flirted with six-week lows on Thursday, while US stocks finished lower on Wednesday, losing ground late in the session as a jump in Treasury yields kept investor nervousness high. The US Federal Reserve will stick to its plan for “steady, gradual” interest rate increases, San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank President John Williams said on Wednesday despite market gyrations and strong data on US wage growth that has bond traders pricing in faster rising inflation.
Hikes in interest rates lead to higher bond yields and dampen the demand for non-yielding gold. The yellow metal is also used as a hedge against inflation.
“The shifting Fed narrative that is gathering hawkish following could be the most significant thorn in the gold bulls side,” said Stephen Innes, head of trading APAC at OANDA. Spot gold is expected to fall more to $1,301 as it has pierced below a support at $1,316 per ounce, according to Reuters technical analyst Wang Tao. Holdings at SPDR Gold Trust, the world’s largest gold-backed exchange-traded fund (ETF), dropped 0.29 percent to 826.90 tons on Wednesday from 829.27 tons on Tuesday. Holdings fell for a second straight session after they marked their worst one-day drop since December 2016 on Tuesday.
“The heavy falls in equities appear to have impacted ETF investors,” ANZ analysts said in a note.
Among other precious metals, silver was little changed at $16.37 per ounce after touching its lowest since Dec. 22 at $16.22 earlier in the session. Platinum declined 0.2 percent to $977.50 per ounce, after touching its lowest since Jan. 11 on Wednesday. Palladium fell 0.3 percent to $981.55 per ounce. Earlier in the session, it hit $977.22, its lowest since Nov. 15.


Can Lebanon’s next government rise to the economic challenge?

Updated 3 min 43 sec ago
0

Can Lebanon’s next government rise to the economic challenge?

  • Before the May 6 vote, leaders from across the deeply divided political establishment sounded the alarm about the state’s finances and economy
  • Lebanon is the world’s third-most indebted nation with a debt-to-GDP ratio of more than 150 percent

BEIRUT: After Lebanon’s first parliamentary election in nine years, the dire economic situation and unsustainable public debt levels are top priorities for the next government.
Before the May 6 vote, leaders from across the deeply divided political establishment sounded the alarm about the state’s finances and economy.
They agree a new government, which is expected to contain the main parties, must be formed quickly, although wrangling over cabinet portfolios could take time, even months.
“The risk is if they really don’t form a government and don’t make any headway with policy in the remainder of this year,” Toby Iles of ratings agency Fitch said.
Why the urgency?
Lebanon is the world’s third-most indebted nation with a debt-to-GDP ratio of more than 150 percent. It climbed from around 130 percent in 2011, before war in neighboring Syria, and the arrival of more than a million refugees, depressed growth and paralyzed government decision-making.
The International Monetary Fund has said Lebanon’s debt trajectory is unsustainable and needs immediate action, otherwise debt-to-GDP could hit 180 percent by 2023.
Annual growth rates have fallen to between 1 and 2 percent, from between 8 and 10 percent in the four years before the Syrian war. Two former pillars of the economy, Gulf Arab tourism and high-end real estate, have suffered.
Outgoing Prime Minister Saad Al-Hariri has said the unemployment rate exceeds 30 percent and UNDP says the number of people in poverty has risen by nearly two-thirds since 2011.
“I believe everyone has realized now that the ship might sink with everyone aboard,” leading Christian politician Samir Geagea said in a recent interview, describing the economic risks.
How has lebanon muddled this long?
Absent an effective government, the central bank has for years maintained stability using stimulus packages and unorthodox financial operations, made possible by the billions of dollars deposited into Lebanese banks by the large diaspora.
Attracted by high interest rates and confidence in the country’s resilience and banks, diaspora deposits have helped Lebanon’s finances survive shocks including the assassination of Rafik Al-Hariri — Saad’s father — and conflicts between Hezbollah and Israel.
But the risk of an increasing dependence on remittances became clear in November when Saad Al-Hariri resigned unexpectedly. Some Lebanese moved their money out of local currency or overseas.
Central bank foreign assets fell by $1.6 billion that month as it defended the Lebanese pound’s peg to the dollar, according to released data. The crisis was short-lived, but the increasingly poor state of national finances has increased the risk that Lebanon might not weather a larger shock so well.
The quicker the government is formed and gets to work, the more support this gives to vital financial inflows.
Despite losing more than a third of his MPs, Hariri is expected to lead the next government.
Central bank policies have kept growth ticking over and foreign reserves high, but they have increased risk in the financial system. The central bank and IMF say such policies should not continue long-term and government policymaking needs to step in.
The finance ministry has met its foreign currency financing needs for 2018 through a $5.5 billion debt swap with the central bank. The transaction will reduce debt-servicing costs and boost central bank reserves, the government said.
What next?
Sectarian politics and corruption have for years stalled reforms needed to boost growth and bring down debt. International donors want to see reforms to release more than $11 billion of investment pledged in April to boost the economy.
“It will be extremely challenging for the next Lebanese government to live up to these reforms. We know how hard it is to change the way things work here, and addressing the vested interests is hard. But there is no alternative way forward,” a western diplomat said.
Beirut hailed the money pledged in Paris as a sign of confidence in the government.
Donors want to preserve stability as war drags on in Syria, but say assistance depends on Beirut working to a credible economic plan and under international oversight to ensure reforms happen.
“We are going to be tough on this and I don’t see anyone else being less tough,” another western diplomat said.
In Paris, Hariri promised to reduce the budget deficit as a percentage of GDP by 5 percent over five years.
Reforming the subsidised power sector, widely seen as deeply corrupt, would be a big help.
Last year the government spent $1.3 billion subsiding the state power provider — 13 percent of primary expenditures. Meanwhile, most homes depend on expensive private generators because state provision is so patchy.
Hariri has led calls for reform since a years-long political deadlock was broken at the end of 2016 and parliament began to take decisions such as launching an offshore oil and gas exploration and passing the first government budget since 2005.