PHOTOS: Dubai records over 500 traffic accidents in 6 hours

Dubai police recorded a total of 564 accidents in 6 hours. (Abu Dhabi Police)
Updated 09 February 2018
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PHOTOS: Dubai records over 500 traffic accidents in 6 hours

Dubai police recorded a total of 564 accidents in 6 hours on Thursday morning due to foggy weather, UAE daily Gulf News reported.  
The Command and Control Unit said that it logged over 3,000 emergency calls during 6am and 12pm local time.
The most severe accident involved 28 vehicles that injured nine people were injured in the incident.
(Abu Dhabi Police)

“Heavy fog was the main reason,” Brigadier Al Mazroui said, explaining that the accident caused a tailback on Emirates Road towards Abu Dhabi.
Due to the accident, Dubai Police blocked the traffic on Emirates Road and diverted trucks to designated parking areas.
Patrols spread along the road to warn other drivers to slow down to allow ambulances and rescue patrols to get through.
(Abu Dhabi Police)

Fog continues to engulf many parts of the country, with poor and limited visibility reported on Friday, weather forecasters said.
Earlier in the week a lorry crash caused a 44-car pile-up that left 22 people injured. Footage captured the moment a man avoided being crushed under the lorry by just seconds before the big crash.
Another video showed the destruction left behind, filming crushed bodies of cars and debris littering the flood of the road in the thick fog.


Ramadan recipes: My Egyptian grandmother’s old school kunafa

Updated 27 May 2018
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Ramadan recipes: My Egyptian grandmother’s old school kunafa

CAIRO: Believed to have originated in the Levant, kunafa is said to have been introduced to what is now known as Egypt during the era of the Fatimids.

However, if you spent any time at all in my grandmother’s household, you would think that she herself invented the deliciously crunchy dessert, she is such an expert.

She often tells me of how, when growing up in Cairo, she would purchase the dough from a street-side man swirling the batter round and round on a drum-like furnace made of clay.

My generation has revamped the age-old favorite and a range of outlandish fillings — from mangoes, to Nutella and avocados — are now available across Egypt and the wider Middle East.

Ramadan is the perfect time to try this popular dessert and while it is easy as pie to pop to your local bakery, there is nothing quite like making it at home.

The original gangster of the kunafa world will always reign supreme, in my humble, well-fed opinion. So read on and give it a go for iftar today.

Ingredients:

• Katafi (shredded phyllo dough).
• One-and-a-half cups of granulated sugar.
• One cup of water.
• One juiced lemon.
• One teaspoon of rose water.
• 1/3 cup of finely chopped pistachios.
• Ghee as needed.

Method:

Grease an oven dish with melted ghee then place the shredded katafi pastry in a bowl and mix it with ghee. You can cut the already shredded pastry further if needed.

Take the mixture and layer it into the greased pan by pressing lightly with your hand.

Bake for 30 minutes at 350F.

On the side, prepare the sugary syrup by adding one cup of water, the granulated sugar and lemon juice to a pan. Stir and bring the mixture to a boil. Let the liquid simmer until it reaches a syrupy consistency. Remove from the heat, let it cool and add the rosewater (or even a few drops of vanilla essence).

Let the shredded pastry cool and drizzle over with the syrup, before you add a sprinkling of the finely chopped pistachios.

If you're looking for something a little different, bear in mind that Ramadan is kunafa season in Egypt and every year, the shredded wheat dessert gets tens of creative makeovers as bakers across the country — and indeed across the Middle East —buck tradition with their innovative fillings.

Why not try one of these delicious variants of the kunafa?

Mango 

When Ramadan began coinciding with the summer season, mango kunafa emerged as a tradition-breaker. The sweet fruit became a popular filling, replacing longtime favorites, such as nuts, cheese and cream. It combines spun-shredded wheat with whipped cream in a dish that is topped with chopped mangoes. 

Chocolate  

This recipe proved irresistible to many when it first caused a storm on social media. The kunafa is filled with hazelnut chocolate filling and is served in various forms, such as chocolate kunafa cones or the molten volcano kunafa. Some bakers even add a layer of peanut butter on top to seal the deal.

Red velvet

This type of kunafa emerged during the recent red velvet craze that swept Egypt.  The creation combines a layer of red velvet cake with shredded wheat and whipped cream.   

Avocado

This one’s sure to please avocado-loving millennials. Last year, a small bakery in Egypt became the talk of the town when it began using avocado as a kunafa filling. It may not be as popular as various other fillings, but it definitely got tongues wagging.

Biscuits 

Oreo cookies are being used to update the humble kunafa this year. Delectably crunchy Lotus biscuits are also being used to create achingly sweet kunafa treats.

Watermelon 

Yes, you read that right! Another seasonal fruit has just joined the club. It remains unclear if the trend will endure, however, as the idea of combining watermelon with shredded wheat is quite unusual. It is ideal for the soaring temperatures this summer, but will it win over dessert lovers? Only time, and empty plates, will tell.