PHOTOS: Dubai records over 500 traffic accidents in 6 hours

Dubai police recorded a total of 564 accidents in 6 hours. (Abu Dhabi Police)
Updated 09 February 2018
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PHOTOS: Dubai records over 500 traffic accidents in 6 hours

Dubai police recorded a total of 564 accidents in 6 hours on Thursday morning due to foggy weather, UAE daily Gulf News reported.  
The Command and Control Unit said that it logged over 3,000 emergency calls during 6am and 12pm local time.
The most severe accident involved 28 vehicles that injured nine people were injured in the incident.
(Abu Dhabi Police)

“Heavy fog was the main reason,” Brigadier Al Mazroui said, explaining that the accident caused a tailback on Emirates Road towards Abu Dhabi.
Due to the accident, Dubai Police blocked the traffic on Emirates Road and diverted trucks to designated parking areas.
Patrols spread along the road to warn other drivers to slow down to allow ambulances and rescue patrols to get through.
(Abu Dhabi Police)

Fog continues to engulf many parts of the country, with poor and limited visibility reported on Friday, weather forecasters said.
Earlier in the week a lorry crash caused a 44-car pile-up that left 22 people injured. Footage captured the moment a man avoided being crushed under the lorry by just seconds before the big crash.
Another video showed the destruction left behind, filming crushed bodies of cars and debris littering the flood of the road in the thick fog.


What We Are Reading Today: Hitler’s American Model, by James Whitman

Updated 15 August 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Hitler’s American Model, by James Whitman

  • The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law 

Nazism triumphed in Germany during the high era of Jim Crow laws in the US.

Did the American regime of racial oppression in any way inspire the Nazis?

The unsettling answer is yes. In Hitler’s American Model, James Whitman presents a detailed investigation of the American impact on the notorious Nuremberg Laws, the centerpiece anti-Jewish legislation of the Nazi regime, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

Contrary to those who have insisted that there was no meaningful connection between American and German racial repression, Whitman demonstrates that the Nazis took a real, sustained, significant, and revealing interest in American race policies.

As Whitman shows, the Nuremberg Laws were crafted in an atmosphere of considerable attention to the precedents American race laws had to offer.

German praise for American practices, already found in Hitler’s Mein Kampf, was continuous throughout the early 1930s, and the most radical Nazi lawyers were eager advocates of the use of American models.