Saudi student saves elderly man from drowning, receives honor

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Ahmed Al-Mohimeed received an award from the charge d'affaires of the Saudi Arabian embassy in Australia for saving an elderly man from drowning. (SPA)
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Ahmed Al-Mohimeed received an award from the charge d'affaires of the Saudi Arabian embassy in Australia for saving an elderly man from drowning. (SPA)
Updated 09 February 2018
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Saudi student saves elderly man from drowning, receives honor

CANBERRA: Mishaal bin Hamdan Al-Ruqi, acting charge d’affaires of the Saudi Arabian Embassy in Australia, awarded a certificate of appreciation to Ahmed Al-Mohimeed in recognition of the Saudi scholarship student’s courage and his distinguished action when saving an elderly man from drowning.
In his address during the honoring ceremony, Al-Ruqi praised the bravery of the honoree, as well as his dedication and responsible demeanor, which allowed him to rescue an old man in the Aldokland River, Melbourne. The man was near drowning due to a heart attack and was being swept away by the strong current. Al-Ruqi said: “This noble act of chivalry reflects the nobility of the Saudi people, and their dedication to extend a helping hand to anyone who needs it.”
For his part, Al-Mohimeed expressed his heartfelt thanks and appreciation to the charge d’affaires for the honor, stressing that his heroic deed incarnates the deeply rooted values and principles of Saudi youth.
The ceremony was also attended by the undersecretary of the Australian Ministry of Education and family members of the Australian man, who extended their thanks and appreciation for the Saudi student’s courageous deed.
Also present were Dr. Hesham Khadawardi, Saudi cultural attache to Australia; Counselor Saad Bin Nasser Al-Asmari; Col. Sami Al Mutairi, military attache; as well as heads of departments and members of the embassy and Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission in Australia.


Expert calls for self-examination for early detection of breast cancer

One in every eight women will suffer from breast cancer in her lifetime. (Shutterstock)
Updated 27 min 45 sec ago
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Expert calls for self-examination for early detection of breast cancer

  • Women in Saudi Arabia have become more aware of the disease and receive support from their families

JEDDAH: In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Dr. Amel Merdad is providing a helpful guide about the disease to women .
Recent statistics from the World Health Organization (WHO) indicate that more than 1.2 million breast cancer cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. Breast cancer kills more than 500,000 women a year. The disease ranks second in cancer incidence, after lung cancer, worldwide.
One in every eight women will breast cancer in her lifetime.
The evolution of scientific research and increased awareness have contributed significantly to the increase in recovery rates, as a result of early detection of the disease.
Ten percent of breast cancer cases occur as a result of genetic mutations inherited by the generations in a family.
The incidence of breast cancer increases with age, and it usually occurs after age 40. The average age of breast cancer patients in Saudi Arabia is 48 years and it is so worldwide. Dr. Merdad provided her advice on early screening methods. “Periodic self-breast examination helps women to be aware and familiar with their breasts so they can take care of them, being healthy and not only pretty.
Dr. Merdad added that self-breast examination is to be done once a month on the sixth or seventh day of the menstrual cycle from the age of 20 and forward. “In the case of menopause, self-examination takes place on the same date every month,” she said.
She also gave these useful guidelines:

Self testing
Stand in front of the mirror and look at the breasts to check for anything unusual, such as the presence of lumps or differences in the size of the breasts or the presence of swelling or changes in skin or nipple.
Put your hands behind your head to notice in the mirror for any difference in the lower part of your breasts. Put your hands on your waist and bend forward slightly with the pressure of the shoulders and elbows forward to check for any change in the shape or size of the breasts.
Lift your left hand and use three fingers from the right hand to examine the left breast in a circular way from the outer edge of the breast and in the direction of the nipple, focusing on the area between the breast and armpit and area under the armpit.
Repeat this step with your right breast. Press the nipple gently to observe any abnormal discharge. Repeat the previous steps while lying on your back.

Screening
Age 20-40 years old: Self-examination is recommended monthly. Also check with your doctor every three years. An ultrasound is recommended for the breast examination only if necessary.
Age 40-65 years: Self-examination is recommended monthly and check with the doctor every year. Mammograms are indicated once every one to two years for all women.
More than 65 years: Monthly self-examination and check with your doctor annually. Schedule a mammogram every two to five years.
Dr. Merdad said that taking care of a woman psychologically plays an important role in enhancing the cure rate.
“To all women. Protect your health, have a great life, and screen yourselves for breast cancer,” she added.