Saudi student saves elderly man from drowning, receives honor

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Ahmed Al-Mohimeed received an award from the charge d'affaires of the Saudi Arabian embassy in Australia for saving an elderly man from drowning. (SPA)
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Ahmed Al-Mohimeed received an award from the charge d'affaires of the Saudi Arabian embassy in Australia for saving an elderly man from drowning. (SPA)
Updated 09 February 2018
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Saudi student saves elderly man from drowning, receives honor

CANBERRA: Mishaal bin Hamdan Al-Ruqi, acting charge d’affaires of the Saudi Arabian Embassy in Australia, awarded a certificate of appreciation to Ahmed Al-Mohimeed in recognition of the Saudi scholarship student’s courage and his distinguished action when saving an elderly man from drowning.
In his address during the honoring ceremony, Al-Ruqi praised the bravery of the honoree, as well as his dedication and responsible demeanor, which allowed him to rescue an old man in the Aldokland River, Melbourne. The man was near drowning due to a heart attack and was being swept away by the strong current. Al-Ruqi said: “This noble act of chivalry reflects the nobility of the Saudi people, and their dedication to extend a helping hand to anyone who needs it.”
For his part, Al-Mohimeed expressed his heartfelt thanks and appreciation to the charge d’affaires for the honor, stressing that his heroic deed incarnates the deeply rooted values and principles of Saudi youth.
The ceremony was also attended by the undersecretary of the Australian Ministry of Education and family members of the Australian man, who extended their thanks and appreciation for the Saudi student’s courageous deed.
Also present were Dr. Hesham Khadawardi, Saudi cultural attache to Australia; Counselor Saad Bin Nasser Al-Asmari; Col. Sami Al Mutairi, military attache; as well as heads of departments and members of the embassy and Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission in Australia.


First Saudi manga artist highlights Arab culture through its proverbs

Netflix selected Samah Kamel to do a workshop that introduced manga art and techniques at Jeddah’s Comic Con 2018.
Updated 21 May 2018
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First Saudi manga artist highlights Arab culture through its proverbs

  • Kamel's research addresses the ability to use manga art to represent the Kingdom’s culture through its proverbs
  • Kamel’s interest in art started in her early years when her mother was an art teacher

JEDDAH: Samah Kamel, a Saudi freelance mangaka (manga artist), earned her master’s degree from the College of Art and Design at King Abdul Aziz University. She is the first Saudi to do her graduation research on manga (Japanese comics). 

Her research addresses the ability to use manga art to represent the Kingdom’s culture through its proverbs. 

The research aimed to define manga art, traditional Saudi proverbs, and how to benefit from manga art to develop contemporary paintings.

Kamel’s interest in art started in her early years when her mother was an art teacher. By watching dubbed animation, Kamel’s interest grew further. 

“The animations and manga productions of the 1990s and 2000s were the starting point for me to do more research on this art and develop my own skills,” she said.

“Manga is directed at all people from different ages and interests with different themes, including romance, action adventure, science fiction, comedy, sports and adult subject matter.”

The idea behind her master’s research was to explore the possibility of using manga as a technique to present known Saudi proverbs, and to introduce manga as an art and tool that can be used to reflect Saudi identity and promote the Kingdom’s culture. 

The research resulted in her first manga book “Hikayat Mathal” (“Tale of Proverb”), published in Arabic and English. The book used manga art to represent Hijazi proverbs visually.

Recognition of manga as an art is increasing among the Kingdom’s young population, and Kamel’s research confirms its recognition at the academic level. 

“Today, we have different channels to start producing manga and animation, such as Manga Productions (an affiliated company of the Prince Mohammed bin Salman bin Abdul Aziz Foundation) and other startups specialized in comics and manga productions,” she said. 

Her published book opened doors for her to discover the public’s interest in manga, and enabled her to meet with talented local artists. 

Netflix selected her to do a workshop that introduced manga art and techniques at Jeddah’s Comic Con 2018.

“Although manga art is increasingly recognized in Saudi Arabia, we lack Arabic resources and books that explain manga art and its history,” Kamel said. 

She is planning to publish her research as a book that discusses manga and its historical developments and techniques.