Saline Water Conversion Corporation receives its Guinness Book of Records certificate

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A confirmation certificate is presented to Abdul Rahman Bin Abdul Mohsen Al-Fadhli, Minister of Water and Electricity, from the Guinness Book of Records. (ARAB NEWS)
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A confirmation certificate is presented to Abdul Rahman Bin Abdul Mohsen Al-Fadhli, Minister of Water and Electricity, from the Guinness Book of Records. (ARAB NEWS)
Updated 10 February 2018
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Saline Water Conversion Corporation receives its Guinness Book of Records certificate

ALKHOBAR: The Saline Water Conversion Corporation has received a certificate from the Guinness Book of Records showing that it holds the world record for seawater desalination.
The government-owned company, which has its headquarters in Riyadh, produces five million cubic meters of water a day.
A confirmation certificate was presented to Abdul Rahman Bin Abdul Mohsen Al-Fadhli, Minister of Water and Electricity, and Ali bin Abdul Rahman Al-Hazmi, the company’s governor, at a board meeting in the city of Al-Khobar on Feb. 9.
Al-Fadhli praised the increase of the company’s production of desalinated water to 5 million cubic meters a day, reinforcing the Kingdom’s position as world leader in desalination development.
He added that it also demonstated the government’s keenness to provide a good standard of life for residents and visitors to the Kingdom. Desalination plays a leading role in providing water security, a fundamental development structure which is one of the most important goals of Vision 2030, he added. At its 2016 launch, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman described Vision 2030 as providing a roadmap for economic and developmental action in the Kingdom.
The board then discussed its agenda for the meeting, incuding a report on safety, security and the environment and an audit of the last financial year. It also discussed a progress on the drive to strengthen performance culture at the plant.
Research findings on boosting plant efficiency were also discussed, including the push to find new economic technologies to support the desalination industry.


Discovery of underground aqueducts from early Islamic era in ancient town of Fayd in Hail

Updated 4 min 25 sec ago
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Discovery of underground aqueducts from early Islamic era in ancient town of Fayd in Hail

ARAB NEWS JEDDAH: A team of Saudi archaeologists have found traces of underwater aqueducts dating back to the early Islamic period in the ancient town of Fayd in Hail.
Fayd is one of Saudi Arabia’s most ancient archaeological and historical cities, which lies east of the city of Hail, about 120 kilometers away, and is the third city of the old pilgrimage route after Kufa and Basra, and it is the largest station on the Iraqi pilgrimage route (Derb Zubaydah).
The team, which operates under the supervision of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH), discovered the fortress annexes outside the fort.
There were more discoveries, including a large number of architectural units, such as an ancient mosque which goes back to the early Islamic era and a number of architectural units that contained many rooms and architectural details that were buried between the exterior and interior walls of the fort.
Part of the interior wall of the fort was discovered in the south side as well as parts of the citadel in the southeastern side of the fort.
The plan of action included the discovery, preparation and cleaning of old wells located in what is known as the (Traditional Town) that is connected to underground aqueducts.