Rose Byrne's greatest technical challenge? 'Peter Rabbit'

Director of the movie Will Gluck (R) and cast members (L-R) Elizabeth Debicki, Margot Robbie, James Corden, Rose Byrne and Domhnall Gleeson pose during a photo call for “Peter Rabbit” in West Hollywood. (Reuters)
Updated 09 February 2018
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Rose Byrne's greatest technical challenge? 'Peter Rabbit'

LOS ANGELES: Rose Byrne has done nearly every type of film — physical comedy ("Bridesmaids," ''Neighbors"), horror ("Insidious"), sci-fi ("Sunshine"), period ("Marie Antoinette"), action ("Troy"), musical ("Annie") and superhero ("X-Men: First Class") — so it might come as a surprise that she met her technical match on "Peter Rabbit."
"I've never done anything this technical!" Byrne says of the film, now playing in theaters. "It's such a production with the CGI. It's just like a guy in a blue suit. It's kind of a surreal and strange. You have to dig deep in your imagination."
Byrne plays Bea in this modern day spin on author and illustrator Beatrix Potter's mischievous rabbit and Mr. McGregor's garden from writer-director Will Gluck ("Easy A," ''Annie"). In the film Bea is an artist who illustrates the rabbits (voiced by the likes of James Corden, Margot Robbie, Daisy Ridley and Elizabeth Debicki) in her backyard and often saves them from the cranky Mr. McGregor (Sam Neill). Things take a turn, however, when old Mr. McGregor dies and his nephew (Domnhall Gleeson) comes to town. Although he's none too happy about the destructive bunnies, he and Bea also start to fall for each other.
"Rose has a very hard part in this movie," Gluck said. "She has to be very funny, she has to be very emotional, she has to be very doting on the rabbits yet I was very conscious, as I am in all my movies, not to make her just a prop. She can't just be there in support of the rabbits or in support of Mr. McGregor. She had to have her own thing and Rose is just a force of nature. You believe everything she does whether it's funny, emotional, sad, goofy or pathetic. And she can't be perfect either."
While the process of capturing the rabbit and human interaction was slow and sometimes tedious in the filming, the result is a seamless blend of technology and reality, with physical comedy and cuteness for the kids and a pretty decent rom-com for the parents. Plus, Gluck shot the film in Australia, which meant work was only 10 minutes from Byrne's home and her parents, who could help watch her young son Rocco while she was on set.
Byrne, 38, and her partner actor Bobby Cannavale, 47, just recently welcomed another son, Rafa, in November — and as any working parent of two children under two would be, she's pretty tired and she's not slowing down her output. She recently stopped over at the Sundance Film Festival to debut her new indie "Juliet, Naked" a rom-com based on the Nick Hornby novel in which she stars in alongside Ethan Hawke and Chris O'Dowd and soon will be gearing up to start production on the adoption comedy "Instant Family" with Mark Wahlberg.
She's also started a production company with some of her female friends in Australia. They're currently working on a project about a Dolly Parton impersonator who fulfills her dream and then has an identity crisis and wants to be taken seriously.
"There is a whole kind of movement in general in the business with female empowerment and female bravery," Byrne said. "It feels like the walls are coming down finally. And I hope we see results in terms of actual films being made and people being removed from power who shouldn't be there. It's exciting and a watershed moment."
One of the casualties of the #MeToo moment involved a film that Byrne co-starred in — Louis C.K.'s "I Love You Daddy" which was pulled from release at the last minute after the comedian and director was accused of sexual misconduct last fall.
"I stand in total solidarity with the women who came forward. It's so brave to do that. I have no idea how hard that would be," she said. "And I'm disappointed and shocked that it all came to that. I haven't seen the film but I've spoken to Chloe Grace Moretz and I think we all felt really sad about it ... I'm huge fan of Louis and wanted to be part of it as an actress and then not knowing the stuff going on behind the scenes. It's a real shame."
Byrne does see hope for change, though, and points to the set of "Neighbors" and its sequel for a film that had a primarily male cast and crew, and was a raunchy comedy at that, as a good example of how to create a safe and inviting and even fun atmosphere for women on set. She credits Seth Rogen (who starred and produced) and director Nick Stoller for setting a "normal" tone.
"The answer is it comes from the top: Who's directing and who's producing, they are steering the ship. They set the tone at the workplace," she said. "They have to be held accountable."


Muse: Singer-songwriter Gaya talks storytelling and creativity

Updated 27 May 2018
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Muse: Singer-songwriter Gaya talks storytelling and creativity

DUBAI: Dubai-based singer-songwriter, vlogger and content creator Gaya (Gayathri Krishnan) talks storytelling, creativity, and experimentation in a conversation with Arab News.

If you want your voice heard, build your own microphone, your own channel, your own soapbox. When you’re young you feel like the world owes you a stage, a chance, a shot. But with time you realize that the dream opportunity, whatever it is, the surest way to get there is to create that opportunity for yourself.

Music inspires me to do most things in my life. It really sets the tone for everything I do and I am. My exploration as a creative person started with music, but over time it has taken me into the spaces of film and design. Whatever the medium, though, a need to be creative and tell a story is what drives me.

Getting into the vlogging space has been extremely rewarding as it has a semblance of the immediacy that a live performance has; you’re connecting with people in real time and you’re breaking the third wall and putting yourself out there. The space feels familiar to me and brings together all my loves — music, shooting and editing films, and telling stories.

I don’t see my work as separate from my life or who I am. It is a very intrinsic part of my existence, so being creative is something I’m engaged in most of the time. I’m proud of having figured out how to make a living by doing all the things that I love and not having to limit myself to doing only one thing or being only one thing.

A lot of my work is autobiographical to some degree. It gives me great joy to be able to have a record of my life and be able to stay present in the moment through the pursuit of my work. I love that I am the boss of my own time and have the privilege and pleasure of working for myself. Most of all, I love that the intent of any idea that I work on is to be able to connect with people on an emotional level.

Every time I travel, I feel like I’m getting to live an alternate reality. I try to have an experience as close to a local as possible, making sure to carve out days to do the mundane things I would do in my own city. This really feeds my creative process in so many ways and many unfinished songs have been completed during my travels. I love traveling for extended periods of time as opposed to short trips because I feel like the best songs and writing come from that pivot point between comfort and discomfort. And when I travel, that oscillation is constant and really gets my creative juices flowing.

I move from project to project with a certain level of uninhibitedness. This somehow leads people to believe that everything I do is locked into some of kind of well-thought out strategy, but in reality every day is pretty much an experiment.

The biggest influence on me as a person has been watching my parents’ love and appreciation for music while I was growing up. Their ability to take anything we were listening to and appreciate every note, every nuance, every instrument, the timbre of the singer’s voice… It was a masterclass in music appreciation. It taught me and my siblings at an early age about the value of art and creativity in the world and how much of a two-way street it is: That as much as one must create for oneself, a perceptive audience is an essential part of any art form made for public consumption.

I admire any artist who isn’t afraid of going against what they set out to do when they started. I think the biggest disservice you can do to yourself as an artist is to say, “I do this one thing.” As great as it is to have a signature style that distinguishes you, it also important to not let it box you in.

My husband is also my music producer. In our relationship, the music came before the love and the marriage, so music has sort of been the cupid in our story. I think what makes it work is that I have always felt an immense sense of trust with him as a producer; that he too, wants the best for these songs. So when we’re both setting out with the same intention, everything else is gravy. We have learned to communicate well with each other and are able to both stand our ground, have both our voices heard and still love each other no matter how heated the creative arguments may get.

There’s still such conditioning around what a woman ought to be and what her role is, and it’s the root of so many problems. “Ambition” in a woman, for example, is seen firstly as something that needs to be talked about or pin-pointed and secondly, and most annoyingly, as some kind of negative, cut-throat thing; a quality that shouldn’t be possessed by women. I’m hoping to continue to voice my opinion when I feel like I’m being boxed into some archaic idea of what a woman ought to be.

A lot of men seem to be shaken and a bit confused about how they figure in a world where women are demanding their rightful place in various spheres. Very few men are happy to engage in a dialogue about this without feeling like we are on opposite sides of the table, but by getting involved they can help move the needle as opposed to drawing more lines in the sand. We need to get on the same page to actually move forward.