Farthest photos ever taken, from nearly 4 billion miles away

This December 2017 false-color image made available by NASA in February 2018 shows KBO (Kuiper Belt object) 2012 HZ84. This image is, for now, one of the farthest pictures from Earth ever captured by a spacecraft. (AP)
Updated 09 February 2018
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Farthest photos ever taken, from nearly 4 billion miles away

CAPE CANAVERAL: The NASA spacecraft that gave us close-ups of Pluto has set a record for the farthest photos ever taken.
In December — while 3.79 billion miles (6.12 billion kilometers) from Earth — the New Horizons spacecraft snapped a picture of a star cluster. The photo surpassed the “Pale Blue Dot” images of Earth taken in 1990 by NASA’s Voyager 1.
The images for “Pale Blue Dot” — part of a composite — were taken 3.75 billion miles (6.06 billion kilometers) away.
New Horizons took more photos as it sped deeper into the cosmos in December. These pictures show two objects in the Kuiper Belt, the so-called twilight zone on the fringes of our solar system.
NASA released the images this week.
New Horizons flew past Pluto in 2015. It’s headed toward an even closer encounter with another icy world, 1 billion miles (1.6 billion kilometers) beyond Pluto, on Jan. 1, 2019. The targeted object is known as 2014 MU69; the spacecraft will pass within 2,175 miles (3,500 kilometers).
“New Horizons just couldn’t be better ... we’re bearing down on our flyby target,” said lead scientist Alan Stern of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado.
New Horizons is currently in electronic hibernation. Flight controllers at a Johns Hopkins University lab in Laurel, Maryland, will awaken the spacecraft in June and start getting it ready for the flyby.
The spacecraft was launched in 2006.


Smart cities at the center of Dubai’s GITEX Technology week

Updated 15 October 2018
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Smart cities at the center of Dubai’s GITEX Technology week

  • The first day of the GITEX Technology week kicked off on Sunday
  • Exhibition centered around the “rise of smart cities”

DUBAI: The first day of the GITEX Technology week kicked off on Sunday in an exhibition that centered around the “rise of smart cities,” with innovation’s front runners from all around the world showcasing what they have to offer.
“We live in a world where all emerging tech is coming together, from blockchain, to drones to automation,” blockchain influencer, Kris Bennet (aka Blockchain Beard Guy) said during opening remarks at the forum, adding that “it’s all heading toward smart cities.”
Bennet also said: “We have seen more change happen in the past 10 years than we ever have.”
Sprawling across Dubai’s massive World Trade Center area, the GITEX stands range from young start-ups hoping to lure sponsors to well-established businesses staying ahead of their competitors with the latest innovations and solutions.
The 38th annual exhibition is split among several categories including, Gulf Comms & Mobility, Global Solution Providers, Smart Workplace & Smart Homes, Value Added Distributors, Printing & Automation, Consumer Tech, Enterprise Software, Network & Security, Future Tech and IOT Big Cloud Data.
One of the more crowded stands was that of digital creative development non-profit MUTEK AE. The stand was a large, white igloo structure standing at the edge of Za’abeel Hall 6 that, upon entering, turns into a journey of lights and sounds that transports visitors into another world.
“It’s bringing together technology and art in an immersive and interactive experience,” Micro MUTEK AE general and artistic director Mehdi Ansari said.
Many country’s pavilions were seen grouping several start-ups across the hall floors, with Lebanon, Bahrain, Japan and South Korea having a considerable presence — showcasing wide-ranging projects from Bluetooth headphones to diet food home deliveries.
GITEX Technology week runs from Oct. 14 — 18, with GITEX Future Stars taking place from the the 14th-17th.