Security force exhibition opened at Janadriyah festival

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The exhibition displays the latest arms and equipment, including 20 types of armored vehicles equipped with heavy and large-caliber arms. (SPA)
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The exhibition displays the latest arms and equipment, including 20 types of armored vehicles equipped with heavy and large-caliber arms. (SPA)
Updated 10 February 2018
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Security force exhibition opened at Janadriyah festival

RIYADH: Special Security Forces Commander, Lt. Gen. Mufleh bin Salim Al-Otaibi, opened the Special Security Forces exhibition on Friday at the 32nd Janadriyah National Heritage and Culture Festival.
He toured the exhibition halls, witnessing the displays of the latest arms and equipment, including 20 types of armored vehicles equipped with heavy and large-caliber arms.
The exhibition also features a panoramic display of more than 16,000 different photographs spotlighting the history and evolution of the forces.
“By partaking in this festival, we also seek to involve all segments of the community in the daily life of members of the force out of our belief that security is a shared social responsibility,” Al-Otaibi said.
Attractions at the event include the skydiving simulator, virtual reality devices and the booth devoted to plastic arts.
The 18-day festival, organized by the Ministry of National Guard, is part of a major initiative to generate awareness of Saudi history and heritage.
Started in 1985, the festival’s main features include a camel race, horse race, falconry, and traditional arts and crafts.
The festival opens from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m daily. The first five days, from Feb. 7 to 11, are reserved for male visitors, women and families may visit from Feb. 12 to 24.


Mosque of Bones: Evidence of Prophet Muhammad’s era

Updated 45 min 52 sec ago
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Mosque of Bones: Evidence of Prophet Muhammad’s era

  • In the 9th year after Hijrah, as the Prophet Muhammad was on his way to battle, he marked the Qibla using bones because he could not find rocks or blocks.
  • To mark the occasion, the area’s residents built a mosque on that spot and named it Masjid Al-Izam.

JEDDAH: Masjid Al-Izam (Mosque of the Bones) is a historic mosque in Al-Ula governorate, located 300 km north of Madinah.
In the ninth year after Hijrah (the emigration of Makkah’s Muslims to Madinah), as the Prophet Muhammad was on his way to battle, he marked the Qibla (the direction in which Muslims should pray) using bones because he could not find rocks or blocks.
To mark the occasion, the area’s residents built a mosque on that spot and named it Masjid Al-Izam.
It was made of stone, and mud was used to cover its walls, but it has undergone several restorations.
“Mention of the mosque can be found in many renowned scientific sources,” Abdullah Kaber, a researcher in Madinah’s development authority, told the Saudi Press Agency (SPA).
He said Masjid Al-Izam has attracted the attention of King Salman, who is focused on restoring a number of historic mosques across the Kingdom.
The Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) is planning to develop tourism in Al-Ula since it houses many historical sites and relics.