Saudi Arabia stock market rebounds, rest of region sluggish

The Saudi Arabia stock market index climbed 0.8 percent in the first 25 minutes. (Reuters)
Updated 12 February 2018
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Saudi Arabia stock market rebounds, rest of region sluggish

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia’s stock market rebounded on Monday as global equities and oil prices regained some strength after last week’s tumble, but other Gulf bourses moved little, with Qatar’s index restrained by its biggest bank going ex-dividend.
The Saudi index climbed 0.8 percent in the first 25 minutes as petrochemical blue chip Saudi Basic Industries added 1.1 percent and Al-Rajhi bank gained 1.6 percent.
Trade Union Cooperative Insurance surged 4.6 percent after reporting an 87 percent leap in fourth-quarter net profit, as gross written premiums increased 35 percent. But Salama Cooperative Insurance fell 2.3 percent after quarterly profit shrank 6 percent.
In Dubai, the index edged down 0.1 percent as amusement park operator DXB Entertainments, the most heavily traded stock, fell 1.6 percent after reporting its net loss widened to Dh1.12 billion last year from Dh485 million in 2016.
But Air Arabia rose 1.5 percent after swinging to a fourth-quarter profit of Dh26 million from a year-ago loss of Dh33 million. However, SICO Bahrain had forecast a much higher profit of Dh68 million.
In Qatar, the index was almost flat as Qatar National Bank went ex-dividend.
Telecommunications firm Ooredoo dropped 2.0 percent after reporting a 13 percent rise in fourth-quarter net profit, though annual profit fell 10 percent as currency depreciations in some markets dented revenue.
But overall, gaining stocks far outnumbered losers by 30 to five, with Qatar Insurance Co. rising 3.1 percent.


Davos 2019: Mideast CEOs turn gloomy on global economy, PwC study finds

Political and business leaders are gathering in the mountain resort of Davos in Switzerland this week. (AP)
Updated 22 January 2019
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Davos 2019: Mideast CEOs turn gloomy on global economy, PwC study finds

  • The loss of confidence from regional CEOs was the second biggest fall in the world, beaten only by North American bosses, whose optimism fell from 63 percent to 37 percent

DAVOS: Chief executives in the Middle East are much less confident on prospects for the global economy than they were in 2018, according to a report from accounting and consulting group PwC.

The firm’s annual survey of top bosses’ attitudes, traditionally launched on the eve of the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos, showed a big drop in the number of CEOs from the region who believe global economic growth will improve in the next 12 months.

Only 28 percent of Middle East business leaders now see an improvement in economic prospects, compared with 52 percent this time last year. Bob Moritz, global chairman of PwC, said: “The prevailing sentiment this year is one of caution in the face of increasing uncertainty.”

The loss of confidence from regional CEOs was the second biggest fall in the world, beaten only by North American bosses, whose optimism fell from 63 percent to 37 percent.

PwC said that the Middle East decline was due to “increased regional economic uncertainty,” while the North American fall was “likely due to the fading of fiscal stimulus and emerging trade tensions.”

The results of the PwC poll - conducted among 1,300 business leaders around the world - reflected an overall decline in business confidence in each region surveyed. Last year, only 5 percent of CEOs said that global economic growth would decline. For 2019, this has jumped to nearly 30 percent.

Globally, confidence in CEOs’ own companies to grow revenue this year has also fallen sharply. Moritz said: “With the rise in trade tension and protectionism it stands to reason that confidence is waning.”

The US retains its lead as the top market for growth among international investors, but many CEOs are turning to other markets, or investing at home. The ongoing trade conflict between the US and China has resulted in a sharp decline in the number of Chinese bosses chosing the US as a market for growth, down from 59 percent last year to only 17 percent for 2019.

Globally, CEOs are still more worried about the threat of over-regulation of their businesses - named as the top concern again in 2019 - but uncertainty about policy has become a major issue too.

In the Middle East, the main concern is geopolitical uncertainty, followed by the threat of cyberattack, policy uncertainty and the speed of technological change.