Saudi Arabia’s King Salman meets British Conservative Party delegation in Riyadh

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Saudi Arabia’s King Salman meets British Conservative Party delegation in Riyadh. (SPA)
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Saudi Arabia’s King Salman meets British Conservative Party delegation in Riyadh. (SPA)
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Saudi Arabia’s King Salman meets British Conservative Party delegation in Riyadh. (SPA)
Updated 12 February 2018
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Saudi Arabia’s King Salman meets British Conservative Party delegation in Riyadh

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia’s King Salman met with the representative of the British Conservative Party Lord Francis Maude at Al-Yamamah Palace in Riyadh on Monday, Saudi state-run news agency SPA reported.
During the meeting, they reviewed the friendly relations between the Kingdom and Britain, the prospects for bilateral cooperation, especially in the parliamentary field, as well as the latest developments in the region.
The meeting was attended by Saudi Arabia’s Minister of State and Member of the Council of Ministers Mased Al-Aiban, Minister of Foreign Affairs Adel Al-Jubeir and Deputy Speaker of the Shoura Council Mohammed Al-Jafri.
The British delegation included UK Ambassador Simon Collis, Conservative Party members Mark Garnier, James Hayaby, Stephen Mitvak, Lord Francis Baring and Keith Simpson, as well as the party’s Middle East Director Charlotte Leslie and Middle East Policy Director Mark Morsen.


Saudi female bikers ready to chart a new course

Updated 33 sec ago
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Saudi female bikers ready to chart a new course

  • Saudi Arabia’s female motorcyclists await clarification on licenses
  • The royal decree in September 2017 that gave women the right to drive in the Kingdom from June 2018 stipulated that the laws on driving would be equal for men and women

JEDDAH: Almost seven months since Saudi Arabia lifted its ban on female drivers, women hoping to be granted a license to ride a motorcycle are still waiting. According to Wael Huraib, founder of Bikers Skills Institute (BSI) — which he claims is the only motorcycle training school for female riders in the Kingdom — no motorbike licenses are currently being issued for women.
“For ladies, as of now, they’re not able to get a license yet, and we don’t really know why,” said Huraib. “We heard that women have received tractor-trailer licenses, but we know for a fact that no motorcycle license applications are being processed. We are assuming the traffic police are very focused on cars, but whatever the problem is, we hope it is resolved soon.”
The royal decree in September 2017 that gave women the right to drive in the Kingdom from June 2018 stipulated that the laws on driving would be equal for men and women. But it appears that is not yet the case, despite assurances from the Saudi Directorate of Traffic a year ago that women would be permitted to drive motorcycles and trucks.
Elena Bukaryeva, an instructor at BSI, said she suspects there is some confusion or miscommunication between the traffic police administration and the licensing division.
“My husband spoke to one of the highest-ranking traffic police officials in Riyadh,” she told Arab News. “He said that there was nothing at all to stop women being issued motorcycle licenses.
“But the following day, one of the ladies who finished our course went to the traffic police and she was told there are no motorcycle licenses for women, only for men. The same thing happened when I applied for my license and when other women did.”
The General Directorate of Traffic did not respond to Arab News’ request for comment.
Bukaryeva said that she has heard of women with licenses issued abroad riding motorcycles in the Kingdom, although added that they are “semi-disguised as men” when doing so.
“When you are wearing loose clothing and a full-face helmet, no one can tell if you are a man or a woman,” she said, adding that she has not tried it herself as her husband told her it was not worth the risk.
BSI began training female riders as soon as the driving ban was lifted.
The company has graduated 18 women so far, including Reem Al-Megbel, a 30-year-old Saudi financial operations manager.
Al-Megbel was at the motorcycle school on Wednesday evening to practice riding, because she cannot, yet, do so on the roads.
“My dream is to wake up one day and have a car and a motorcycle in my garage and be free to choose what to drive,” she said. “It would probably be the motorcycle.”
Al-Megbel added that her “ultimate” dream, though, would be to take a road trip across the Kingdom with a group of fellow female bikers.
“That,” she said, “would be freedom.”