'Suspicious package' found in UK parliament contained white powder: London police

Witnesses said the police were dealing with a 'suspicious package' at the Houses of Parliament in the UK. (Shutterstock)
Updated 13 February 2018
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'Suspicious package' found in UK parliament contained white powder: London police

LONDON: The Metropolitan Police launched an investigation into a 'suspicious package' found inside the Houses of Parliament on Tuesday.
According to reports, a House of Commons spokesperson had previously commented on the situation, saying that the police were investigating an 'incident' on the Parliamentary Estate, but without providing any further details.
When contacted by Arab News, a Metropolitan Police spokesperson said it was "looking into the incident" and that it was being dealt with by specialist officers.
A short statement said: "At approximately 11:36am on Tuesday, 13 February, police were informed of a suspicious package that had been delivered to an office within the Palace of Westminster. Police are at the scene and dealing.
"A letter contained a white powder which is currently being assessed by specialists. The office remains closed at this time, but the rest of the Palace of Westminster is open.
"Detectives from the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command have been informed and are investigating."
A UK parliament statement went on to say that the white powder in the package has been found to be non-harmful, the lower house of the legislature said.
The package is understood to have been delivered to an office below the House of Commons chamber. The UK parliament is in recess this week, however, so the vast majority of ministers are not currently in Westminster.
 


Libya planning to extradite Manchester bomber’s brother

Britain last year submitted a request to extradite Hashem Abedi. (Ahmed Bin Salman, Special Deterrent Force via AP)
Updated 15 November 2018
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Libya planning to extradite Manchester bomber’s brother

  • Abedi's brother, Salman, detonated the bomb, killing himself, outside one of the arena exits shortly after the end of a concert by pre-teen idol Ariana Grande

Libya is planning to extradite the brother of Manchester Arena bomber Salman Abedi to Britain by the end of the year, Libya’s UN-backed Prime Minister Fayez Al-Sarraj told the BBC in an interview.

Britain last year submitted a request to extradite Hashem Abedi after the bombing in May 2017 in which 22 people — many of them minors — were killed.

Abedi detonated the bomb, killing himself, outside one of the arena exits shortly after the end of a concert by pre-teen idol Ariana Grande.

Hashem Abedi is suspected of involvement and is wanted by Manchester police on charges of murder, attempted murder and conspiracy to cause explosions.

In an interview with the BBC on the sidelines of an international conference in Italy, Al-Sarraj said: “I think from here to the end of this year we will finish all the legal procedures in Libya.

“We are fully cooperating because we understand the suffering of the families of the victims of this terrorist attack.

“According to the general prosecutor we can extradite. After we complete the legal process in Libya it is only a matter of time.”

When Britain first made the extradition request in November 2017, the armed group holding him refused it.

The Manchester Arena bombing was Britain’s worst terror attack in more than a decade.

Salman Abedi was born in Manchester in 1994, to parents who had been granted asylum after fleeing Muammer Qaddafi’s regime.

He was in Libya just days before the attack.