Drone strike kills 2 Al-Qaeda suspects in Yemen

In this file photo, people gather around a motorcycle destroyed in a drone strike in Yemen. (Reuters)
Updated 17 February 2018
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Drone strike kills 2 Al-Qaeda suspects in Yemen

ADEN: A US drone strike in central Yemen killed two suspected Al-Qaeda members on a motorbike including a local commander, a security official said Saturday.
The unmanned aircraft struck the motorcycle carrying the men in Bayda province at around midnight Friday, the official told AFP.
"The strike targeted two Al-Qaeda militants, local commander Abu Hussein Al-Theriya and another, Dawoud Al-Sanaani, as they rode through the province," he said.
Although the US only sporadically reports on its long-running bombing campaign against Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), it is the only force known to operate armed drones over Yemen.
The drone war has intensified since President Donald Trump took office.
Washington also backs ally Saudi Arabia in its military intervention in Yemen, launched in 2015 with the aim of forcing Iran-backed rebels from the capital and restoring the government to power.
AQAP and Daesh have flourished in the chaos of the conflict.


Three kidnapped Turkish engineers released in southern Libya

Updated 4 min 33 sec ago
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Three kidnapped Turkish engineers released in southern Libya

  • Three Turkish engineers kidnapped last year in the southern Libyan town of Ubari have been released
  • The engineers were working for the Turkish company Enka on a 640 MW power plant in Ubari deep in Libya’s south

TRIPOLI: Three Turkish engineers kidnapped last year in the southern Libyan town of Ubari have been released, the UN-backed Libyan government said.
In November, an unknown armed group kidnapped four engineers, three from Turkey and one from South Africa. The engineers were working for the Turkish company Enka on a 640 MW power plant in Ubari deep in Libya’s south.
The fate of the South African is not known.
“The three Turkish engineers have been released,” the Tripoli-based government said in a statement, adding that they would be flown back to Turkey via Tripoli.
They were released on Saturday.
Kidnapping is rife in Libya, especially in the lawless south. Work at the Ubari plant has been going on for years and was in the final stages when the kidnapping happened.
A week after the four engineers were kidnapped the firm evacuated 93 of its staff from Libya.
Work on the power plant has stopped since that time, a blow to efforts to lure back foreign firms.
Most foreign companies have shied away from working in Libya because of security problems following the NATO-backed toppling of Muammer Qaddafi in 2011.