’Screaming Mummy’ displayed in Egypt museum

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A photo taken on February 14, 2018 shows the "Screaming Mummy" known scientifically as "the unknown man E" on display at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo's Tahrir Square. (AFP)
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A photo taken on February 14, 2018 shows the "Screaming Mummy" known scientifically as "the unknown man E" on display at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo's Tahrir Square. (AFP)
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A photo taken on February 14, 2018 shows the "Screaming Mummy" known scientifically as "the unknown man E" on display at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo's Tahrir Square. (AFP)
Updated 18 February 2018
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’Screaming Mummy’ displayed in Egypt museum

CAIRO: The Egyptian Museum in Cairo has put on display the “Screaming Mummy” of the son of a pharaoh who may have been hanged for plotting his father’s murder.
Dubbed “the unknown man E,” the mummy which is not usually exhibited appears to be of a man who died an agonizing death.
Egypt’s antiquities ministry has said DNA analysis confirmed the mummy was a son of Ramses III, who ruled between 1186 BC and 1155 BC.
It showed signs that the man had been hanged and shrouded in sheepskin, which the ancient Egyptians considered impure.
Pentawere, the son of Ramses III, was sentenced to hang for his role in the plot, according to an ancient papyrus record of the conspiracy.
Pentawere conspired with his mother Tiye, the second wife of Ramses III, to murder the king.
It is not clear if Ramses III was killed in the plot, but there are indications that he was stabbed in the neck.
An Eye of Horus amulet, representing healing and protection, was placed around Ramses III’s throat, the ministry statement said.


102-year-old great-granny becomes ‘oldest’ skydiver

Updated 12 December 2018
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102-year-old great-granny becomes ‘oldest’ skydiver

  • 102-year-old says she "felt normal" during the jump
  • She made the jump to raise awareness for motor neuron disease

SYDNEY, Australia: A 102-year-old great-grandmother is believed to have become the world’s oldest skydiver after plunging 14,000 feet (4,300 meters) through the South Australian sky.
Centenarian adrenaline junkie Irene O’Shea said she “felt normal” after a 220 kilometer per hour (140 mph) dive that sent her cheeks flapping wildly.
She completed her first skydive to mark her 100th birthday in 2016, but organizers claimed it was Sunday’s successful tandem dive at the age of 102 years and 194 days that earned her a place in the history books.
“It was very clear up there, and the weather was good but it was very cold,” said O’Shea, according to Australian media.
O’Shea took the plunge to raise funds for a motor neurone disease charity, after her daughter died from the illness.