’Screaming Mummy’ displayed in Egypt museum

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A photo taken on February 14, 2018 shows the "Screaming Mummy" known scientifically as "the unknown man E" on display at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo's Tahrir Square. (AFP)
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A photo taken on February 14, 2018 shows the "Screaming Mummy" known scientifically as "the unknown man E" on display at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo's Tahrir Square. (AFP)
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A photo taken on February 14, 2018 shows the "Screaming Mummy" known scientifically as "the unknown man E" on display at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo's Tahrir Square. (AFP)
Updated 18 February 2018
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’Screaming Mummy’ displayed in Egypt museum

CAIRO: The Egyptian Museum in Cairo has put on display the “Screaming Mummy” of the son of a pharaoh who may have been hanged for plotting his father’s murder.
Dubbed “the unknown man E,” the mummy which is not usually exhibited appears to be of a man who died an agonizing death.
Egypt’s antiquities ministry has said DNA analysis confirmed the mummy was a son of Ramses III, who ruled between 1186 BC and 1155 BC.
It showed signs that the man had been hanged and shrouded in sheepskin, which the ancient Egyptians considered impure.
Pentawere, the son of Ramses III, was sentenced to hang for his role in the plot, according to an ancient papyrus record of the conspiracy.
Pentawere conspired with his mother Tiye, the second wife of Ramses III, to murder the king.
It is not clear if Ramses III was killed in the plot, but there are indications that he was stabbed in the neck.
An Eye of Horus amulet, representing healing and protection, was placed around Ramses III’s throat, the ministry statement said.


Japan worker’s pay docked for taking lunch 3 minutes early

Updated 21 June 2018
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Japan worker’s pay docked for taking lunch 3 minutes early

TOKYO: A Japanese city official has been reprimanded and fined for repeatedly leaving his desk during work hours — but only for around three minutes to buy lunch.
The official, who works at the waterworks bureau in the western city of Kobe, began his designated lunch break early 26 times over the space of seven months, according to a city spokesman.
“The lunch break is from noon to 1 pm. He left his desk before the break,” the spokesman said on Thursday.
The official, 64, had half a day’s pay docked as punishment and the bosses called a news conference to apologize.
“It’s deeply regrettable that this misconduct took place. We’re sorry,” a bureau official told reporters, bowing deeply.
The worker was in violation of a public service law stating that officials have to concentrate on their jobs, according to the bureau.
The news sparked a heated debate on Japanese social media, with many defending the official.
“It’s sheer madness. It’s crazy. What about leaving your desk to smoke?” said one Twitter user.
“Is this a bad joke? Does this mean we cannot even go to the bathroom?” said another.
The city had previously suspended another official in February for a month after he had left his office numerous times to buy a ready-made lunch box during work hours.
The official was absent a total of 55 hours over six months, according to the city.