Salah mania prompts ‘I’ll be Muslim too’ Liverpool chant

Liverpool's Mohamed Salah, 3rd left, celebrates after scoring his side's second goal during the Champions League round of sixteen first leg soccer match between FC Porto and Liverpool FC at the Dragao stadium in Porto, Portugal, on Feb. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Luis Vieira)
Updated 18 February 2018
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Salah mania prompts ‘I’ll be Muslim too’ Liverpool chant

LONDON: So good has been Liverpool’s Egyptian winger Mohamed Salah’s start to life at Anfield, fans are singing about converting to Islam in honor of their new idol.
Salah became the second fastest Liverpool player to reach 30 goals in a season with a balletic finish in just his 36th appearance for the club in Wednesday’s 5-0 Champions League rout of Porto.
And in the streets of the Portuguese city in midweek the traveling Liverpool fans struck up a new chant to the tune of 90s hit ‘Good Enough’ by Dodgy with the line: “If he scores another few, then I’ll be Muslim too!“
“This is the first time I’ve seen such an exuberant, overt, positive appreciation that includes religion,” Piara Powar, Executive Director of Football Against Racism in Europe (FARE) told the Washington Post.
The African player of the year is a devout Muslim and often celebrates his goals by kneeling in prayer.


First sounds of wind on Mars captured by InSight spacecraft

Updated 09 December 2018
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First sounds of wind on Mars captured by InSight spacecraft

  • 20 second audio clip shows sound of wind on Mars
  • Clip also supports evidence of wind speed and direction on Mars

DUBAI: An audio clip of the first sounds captured on Mars by its latest inhabitant, the InSight probe, was released last week, British broadcaster BBC reported.

The clip, 20 seconds long, has captured the sound of the wind on the desert planet.

InSight carries a British-made seismometer package, which was able to detect the vibrations from Martian air rushing over the solar panels.

Professor Tom Pike, leading the seismometer experiment from Imperial College London, likened the placement of the solar panels to the robot “cupping its ears”. “[They are] the perfect acoustic receivers.” he said.

The wind on Mars moves from the northeast to the southeast at about five to seven meters per second, according to the latest estimates. This falls in line with evidence shown by satellite pictures that display the tracks left by dust devils travelling in the same direction.

 “This is brilliant news because it means we know the sensors have survived the rigors of landing on Mars and are meeting the requirements to achieve their science goals,” Sue Horne, head of space exploration at the UK Space Agency, told the BBC.

“It is just amazing to hear the first ever sounds from Mars,” Horne added.

InSight landed on Mars on November 26th, following a six-month journey from Earth. Its overall aim is to study the world's interior from the mission site, a flat plain just north of Mars's equator.