Court orders detention of Egyptian TV anchor in ‘child abduction’ case

Reham Saeed has been detained for allegedly ‘inciting the kidnapping of two children.’ (Courtesy Al-Nahar TV)
Updated 19 February 2018
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Court orders detention of Egyptian TV anchor in ‘child abduction’ case

CAIRO: Egypt’s Public Prosecution on Monday ordered the detention of controversial TV host Reham Saeed for her alleged “incitement” of a “child abduction” case as part of a program on the topic, it has been reported.
Saeed will be detained for four days pending investigations, along with her program’s producers and editors, on charges of “inciting the kidnapping of two children to prepare an episode of the program,” newspaper reports said.
The prosecution had previously ordered the detention of the program’s producer and photographer for 15 days in relation to the case.
Saeed has been off air for the past few weeks after an episode on child kidnapping in Egypt landed her in hot water.
It is reported that a producer in her team got in touch with a gang that kidnaps children and puts them for sale. Allegedly pretending to be a customer for the purpose of the episode, the producer contacted the gang and asked if she could purchase “two children for 300,000 Egyptian pounds,” to which the gang agreed.
On the day the gang decided to hand over the children, the producer said authorities were informed of the matter, and knew the time and location of where the children were going to be exchanged.
It is reported that police had raided the location, arrested the kidnappers and freed the children.
But the “Sabaya El-Khair” program team were later accused by the kidnapers of “inciting the abduction of the children” by offering the money.
Saeed reportedly faces three charges: The assistance and incitement to kidnap children; broadcasting false news that could disturb social peace; and the trafficking of children, according to Al-Masry El-Youm.
Judicial sources reportedly said that Saeed denied knowing about the process of the alleged child abductions, and that she simply presents the show and discusses what the editor prepares for her.
Saeed not only denies the allegations, but says her program has worked on “aiding the children of Egypt” and would never take part in a kidnapping.
Saeed was previously suspended in 2016 when she hosted a sexual harassment victim on air and allegedly blamed her “inappropriate clothing” as reason for the assault.


Facebook accused of discrimination with job ad targeting

Updated 19 September 2018
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Facebook accused of discrimination with job ad targeting

  • It charges that job ads on Facebook targeted male users only
  • Facebook lets advertisers target ads on the basis of gender and age, which is against the law in America

WASHINGTON: A complaint has been filed with the US government accusing Facebook and 10 other companies of using the platform’s job ad targeting system to discriminate on the basis of gender.
The complaint was announced Tuesday by the American Civil Liberties Union, a union called the Communications Workers of America and a labor law firm, on behalf of three female job seekers and a group of “thousands” of members represented by the union.
It charges that job ads on Facebook targeted male users only. It also alleges that most of the listings were for jobs in male-dominated fields, so women and non-binary users were excluded from seeing these ads.
Facebook lets advertisers target ads on the basis of gender and age, which is against the law in America, the complaint reads.
“I shouldn’t be shut out of the chance to hear about a job opportunity just because I am a woman,” said Bobbi Spees, one of the three women named in the complaint.
Facebook spokesman Joe Osborne said in a statement to CNNMoney that there is no place for discrimination on Facebook.
“It’s strictly prohibited in our policies, and over the past year we’ve strengthened our systems to further protect against misuse,” Osborne said.
Facebook will defend itself once it has reviewed the complaint, he added.
The ACLU noted that online platforms such as Facebook are generally not liable for content published by others.
“But in this case, Facebook is doing much more than merely publishing content created by others,” the advocacy group argued.
“It has built the architecture for this discriminatory marketing framework, enabled and encouraged advertisers to use it, and delivered the gender-based ads according to employers’ sex-based preferences.”
Last month the US Department of Housing and Urban Development accused Facebook of breaking the law by letting landlords and home sellers use its ad-targeting system to discriminate against potential buyers or tenants.
Facebook responded by cutting more than 5,000 ad-targeting options to prevent advertisers from discriminating on the basis of traits such as religion or race.