Iraq to deport suspected French militant who served sentence

In this Jan. 27, 2018, photo, U.S. Army soldiers speak to families in rural Anbar on a reconnaissance patrol near a coalition outpost in western Iraq. (AP)
Updated 19 February 2018
0

Iraq to deport suspected French militant who served sentence

BAGHDAD: An Iraqi court ordered the release and deportation of a suspected French militant sentenced on Monday to seven months in prison for entering the country illegally, saying she had already served her time.
Melina Bougedir, 27, was arrested last summer in former Daesh stronghold Mosul with her four children, three of whom have been repatriated to France.
Wearing a black dress and purple headscarf, she entered the courtroom holding her other child, a boy with blond hair.
Speaking in Arabic, she said that she had been a housewife in Mosul.
“I entered Syria with my French passport but Daesh took it from me. I stayed in Syria for four days and then came to Mosul with my husband and four children.”
She said that her French husband Maximilien, whom she said had been a cook for Daesh, was killed as Iraqi forces battled to oust the militant group from Mosul, which was recaptured last July. Asked her if she regretted what she did, she replied: “Yes.”
Iraq in December declared victory against Daesh after a years-long battle to retake large swathes of territory the extremists had seized in 2014.
An Iraqi court last month condemned a German woman to death by hanging after finding her guilty of belonging to Daesh, the first such sentence in a case involving a European woman.
Soon afterwards, lawyers for Bougedir and another French woman awaiting trial in Iraq for allegedly joining Daesh wrote to French President Emmanuel Macron warning that they could face the death penalty.
Several dozen French citizens suspected of links to the militant group are believed to be in detention camps or prisons in Syria and Iraq.
French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said in Baghdad last week that suspected militants should be tried in the countries where they committed their “crimes,” while reiterating France’s opposition to the death penalty.
Britain has also taken a firm stance against repatriation, as has Belgium which denied a request by one of its nationals to be sent home from Iraq in exchange for cooperating with the authorities.
Several hundred foreigners, both men and women, are thought to have been detained in Iraq for alleged links to Daesh.
In December, a Swedish man of Iraqi origin was among 38 people executed after being convicted of “terrorism.”
And on Sunday, an Iraqi court sentenced a Turkish woman to death and 11 other foreign widows to life in jail for belonging to Daesh, despite their pleas that they had been duped or forced by their husbands to join them in Iraq.


Egypt offers residency to foreign investors

Updated 21 November 2018
0

Egypt offers residency to foreign investors

  • A three-year residency is on offer for those who invest $200,000, and five years for those who purchase property worth $400,000
  • To begin the process for obtaining Egyptian residency, a preliminary contract must be agreed between the property owner and the foreign investor

CAIRO: In an attempt to further boost its booming real estate sector and attract foreign investment, Egypt will grant residency permits to foreigners who invest at least $100,000 in the country’s property market.
The growth rate of Egypt’s property market stands at 133 percent in 2018. This has been fueled by strong demand for housing, along with the sporadic launch of residential construction projects.
The minimum investment required to obtain a residency permit is $100,000. A three-year residency is on offer for those who invest $200,000, and five years for those who purchase property worth $400,000. The offer also applies to properties that are still under construction.
Khaled Abbas, the deputy minister of housing, said the procedures for the scheme are being set up in consultation with the Passport, Immigration and Nationality Administration.
To begin the process for obtaining Egyptian residency, a preliminary contract must be agreed between the property owner and the foreign investor, and then signed by an authorized body, such the Urban Communities Authority, the Tourism Development Authority or the governorate in which the property is located. Bank statements must also be provided confirming that the money has been transferred from overseas. The passport office will then approve the period of residence.
Members of the House of Representatives welcomed the announcement as a positive move for Egypt and an incentive for foreign investment, which it is hoped will create jobs and economic opportunities.
Whether the public will be so keen remains to be seen.
“This might be a bit problematic,” said Aly Salem, a resident of Cairo. “The housing demand in Egypt is already high, with the surging youth population and more and more people looking to get married each year. Where will they stay, if foreigners start swooping in and acquiring both residency and a huge housing unit with just $100,000?”
Offering further details, Gen. Kamel Amer, the head of the Parliament’s Defense and National Security Committee, said foreigners will not have any political rights for the first five years of residency and they will not be eligible to vote for 10 years. He also said spouses and children of investors will not be granted residency unless they live in Egypt.
Spain and Portugal have implemented similar programs in an attempt to boost their property markets. Previously, a foreigner had to live in Egypt for 10 consecutive years to be eligible for naturalization.
The new residency law is part of the efforts to repair the damage to Egypt’s economy caused by severe austerity measures imposed after the $12 billion loan package from the International Monetary Fund in 2016.
The cost and size of properties in Egypt, which are often large and lavish apartments, compare favorably to those in many other countries. Despite this, few Egyptians can afford to pay for a house upfront, but some private property developers are offering 10-year, interest-free installment plans.