Queen Elizabeth II makes first visit to London Fashion Week

Britain's Queen Elizabeth sits next to fashion editor Anna Wintour, right, and Caroline Rush, chief executive of the British Fashion Council (BFC) as they view Richard Quinn's runway show at London Fashion Week. (AP)
Updated 20 February 2018
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Queen Elizabeth II makes first visit to London Fashion Week

LONDON: Queen Elizabeth II has made her first visit to London Fashion Week to present an award recognizing British design excellence.
The 91-year-old monarch gave out the first Queen Elizabeth II Award for British Design on Tuesday to London-born Richard Quinn.
She sat next to American Vogue chief editor Anna Wintour in the front row.
The queen wore an Angela Kelly duck egg blue tweed dress and jacket detailed with tiny Swarovski crystals.
She also toured showrooms before presenting the award on the final day of fashion week.
Quinn established his label in 2016 after studying fashion at Central Saint Martins and has been widely recognized as one of Britain’s talented young designers


Lana El-Sahely gets biker chic in Paris

The Dior SS'19 show was an ethereal treat. (AFP)
Updated 26 September 2018
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Lana El-Sahely gets biker chic in Paris

  • Lana El-Sahely showed off her style at Paris Fashion Week
  • Dior led Paris Fashion Week with a new modern dance piece by choreographer Sharon Eyal

DUBAI: Lebanese fashion blogger Lana El-Sahely showed off her style at Paris Fashion Week, posing for cameras at the coveted Dior show earlier this week.

Dior led Paris fashion week on a sensual dance Monday with a spectacular show woven around a new modern dance piece by choreographer Sharon Eyal to kick off the nine-day extravaganza.

For her part, El-Sahely wore a quirky patchwork skirt paired with a leather biker jacket over a delicate lace top. She finished off the look with a peaked cap and chunky boots.

On the catwalk, icily restrained models brushed past writhing dancers in a performance specially created by the acclaimed Israeli in a fog of mist and falling paper petals.

Designer Maria Grazia Chiuri told AFP that using dance was “an act of liberation” to break free from the catwalk corset.

Gucci — which quit Milan for the French capital to show its spring summer collection — later got in on the act by taking over a Paris theater and having singer Jane Birkin, her back turned to most of the audience, sing her 1983 hit “Baby Alone in Babylone.”

With K-pop superstar Kai mobbed outside by fans, Gucci’s designer Alessandro Michele served up an extra large helping of the oddball 1970s kitsch which has made him such a hit with millennials.

Mickey Mouse manbags, wacky Y-fronts, sleeping mask shades, underpants on the outside of slacks and medallions as big as mayoral chains are only a taster of some of the wacky new looks fashion’s jester-in-chief pulled from his wide-brimmed hat.

His playful, luxuriant bad taste could not be further from Chiuri’s earnest elegance.

Chiuri said she wanted to replicate dance’s “naturalness... but also its discipline” in a striking

Meanwhile, Saint Laurent headlined the second day of Paris Fashion Week in an eclectic French twist on American styles that featured models walking on water.

Tuesday’s Spring/Summer collections also showcased emerging talents: from 26-year-old designer Marine Serre to the Tokyo-based house Anrealage, The Associated Press reported.

Stars such as Kate Moss, Cindy Crawford, Matt Dillon and Salma Hayek huddled together in front of 10 giant white palm trees as the Eiffel Tower sparkled at the stroke of 8 p.m.

Below the trees was a giant expanse of water.

Models in luxury snake boots and sparkling disco heels suddenly appeared and — forgoing the dry catwalk strip — darted sideward to walk straight across the water.

It triggered gasps from spectators, including a tardy Lindsay Lohan.

But behold, the models didn’t sink. Instead, they merely sloshed and splashed.

Designer Anthony Vaccarello was applauded for an impressive biblical-style trompe l’oeil feature for the 15-minute show that created the illusion of a sea despite the water measuring only two centimeters in depth.

One American fashion editor duly commented that designers are “ruining a lot of perfectly good shoes with these water effects this season.”