US senator says $6bn in aid for Jordan likely to rise

Sen. Lindsey Graham said senators dealing with foreign aid will talk to the International Monetary Fund ‘about taking some pressure off’ Jordan regarding economic austerity measures. (AP Photo)
Updated 20 February 2018
0

US senator says $6bn in aid for Jordan likely to rise

AMMAN, Jordan: The chairman of a US Senate panel dealing with foreign aid says a recently signed agreement granting Jordan $1.275 billion a year through 2022 “is a floor” and that Congress is likely to authorize additional financial support for the kingdom.
Sen. Lindsey Graham, a Republican from South Carolina, was among seven senators visiting Jordan, a key US security ally in the region.
Graham told reporters Tuesday that he hopes everyone in the US “understands how important it is for this kingdom to survive.”
He says the senators will talk to the International Monetary Fund “about taking some pressure off” Jordan regarding economic austerity measures.
Jordan has suffered an economic downturn and rising unemployment, raising fears of growing instability, in part because of fallout from conflicts in neighboring Syria and Iraq.


Nobel laureate Murad to build hospital in her hometown in Iraq

Updated 15 December 2018
0

Nobel laureate Murad to build hospital in her hometown in Iraq

  • The laureate was awarded the $1 million prize alongside Congolese doctor Denis Mukwege
  • She said she will use the money to “build a hospital in Sinjar to treat ill people, mainly widows and women”

SINJAR, Iraq: Nadia Murad, an Iraqi Yazidi woman held as a sex slave by Daesh militants who won this year’s Nobel Peace Prize, said on Friday she intended to use the prize money to build a hospital for victims of sexual abuse in her hometown.
The Yazidi survivor was speaking to a crowd of hundreds in Sinjar, her hometown in northern Iraq.
“With the money I got from the Nobel Peace prize, I will build a hospital in Sinjar to treat ill people, mainly widows and women who were exposed to sexual abuses by Daesh militants,” she told the crowd and gathered journalists.
She thanked the Iraqi and Kurdistan governments for agreeing to her plan and said she would be contacting humanitarian organizations “soon” to start construction.
Murad was awarded the $1 million prize alongside Congolese doctor Denis Mukwege for their efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict.
She was one of about 7,000 women and girls captured in northwest Iraq in August 2014 and held by Daesh in Mosul, where she was tortured and raped.
She escaped after three months and reached Germany, from where she campaigned extensively to appeal for support for the Yazidi community.
The Yazidi area in Sinjar had previously been home to about 400,000 people, mostly Yazidis and Arab Sunnis.
In a matter of days, more than 3,000 Yazidis were killed and about 6,800 kidnapped, either sold into slavery or conscripted to fight for Daesh as the religious minority came under attack.