400,000 trapped in Assad’s ‘monstrous campaign of annihilation’ in Eastern Ghouta

UN human rights chief Zeid Ra’ad Al-Hussein described the assault by the Syrian regime forces as a ‘monstrous campaign of annihilation.’ (AP)
Updated 22 February 2018
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400,000 trapped in Assad’s ‘monstrous campaign of annihilation’ in Eastern Ghouta

BEIRUT: Desperate residents trapped in Eastern Ghouta waited for their “turn to die” on Wednesday beneath one of the most intense bombardments of the Syrian war.
UN human rights chief Zeid Ra'ad Al-Hussein described the assault by Syrian regime forces as a “monstrous campaign of annihilation” against the opposition-held territory on the edge of Damascus.
At least 310 people have been killed in the district since Sunday night and more than 1,550 injured, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. At least 38 people died on Wednesday.
UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres called for an immediate halt to the fighting to allow aid to reach those in need and for the injured to be evacuated.
The bombing meant the 400,000 people trapped in the area “live in hell on Earth,” Guterres told the Security Council.
“We are waiting our turn to die. This is the only thing I can say,” said Bilal Abu Salah, 22, whose wife is five months pregnant in the biggest Eastern Ghouta town Douma.
“Nearly all people living here live in shelters now. There are five or six families in one home. There is no food, no markets,” he told Reuters.
Images from inside the area showed men searching through the rubble of smashed buildings, carrying blood-smeared people to hospital and cowering in debris-strewn streets.
A doctor working in the area told the BBC that the situation is “catastrophic.” “We don't have anything — no food, no medicine, no shelter,” Dr. Bassam said.
“Maybe every minute we have 10 or 20 airstrikes ... I will treat someone — and after a day or two they come again, injured again.”
He said the international community had abandoned the people living there.
Eastern Ghouta, a densely populated agricultural district, is the last major area near the capital still under rebel control. It has been besieged by regime forces for years.
The bombardment of rocket fire, shelling, airstrikes and helicopter-dropped barrel bombs escalated rapidly on Sunday. The assault has devastated the area, indiscriminately ending lives of men, women and children and inflicting horrific injuries. After one airstrike on Wednesday, rescuers pulled four children from the building, but their father was killed, leaving them as orphans, Reuters reported.
Guterres expressed support for a Swedish and Kuwaiti push for the Security Council to demand a 30-day cease-fire in Syria.
Diplomats said the council could vote on a draft resolution in the coming days.
Russia, an ally of President Bashar Assad has called the proposal “not realistic,” but called for a meeting of the council on Thursday to discuss the situation.
A commander in the coalition fighting on behalf of Assad's government told Reuters the bombing aims to prevent the rebels from targeting the eastern neighborhoods of Damascus with mortars.
“The offensive has not started yet. This is preliminary bombing,” the commander said.
Eastern Ghouta is one of a group of “de-escalation zones” under a diplomatic cease-fire initiative agreed by Assad's allies Russia and Iran with Turkey which has backed the rebels.
Mohammad Alloush, the political chief of Jaish Al-Islam, one of the main rebel factions in Eastern Ghouta, said: “There are attempts from some international and local sides for a truce process in Eastern Ghouta and they have not succeeded so far.”


War fears mount despite cease-fire between Gaza and Israel

Updated 22 July 2018
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War fears mount despite cease-fire between Gaza and Israel

  • Any further escalation will deepen humanitarian catastrophe in the Strip: UN chief
  • Before the truce, Israel unleashed an offensive it says destroyed more than 60 Hamas targets, including three battalion headquarters

GAZA CITY: After seven chaotic and violent hours, quiet returned to the Gaza Strip Friday night. Yet on Saturday, civilians in the Palestinian enclave and Israel remained fearful of the potential for a new war.
The fatal shooting by a Palestinian sniper of an Israeli soldier during protests along the border on Friday sparked a widespread wave of Israeli bombing, with three fighters from Hamas killed and dozens of targets struck.
After intensive indirect mediation by the UN and Egypt, a truce came into force at midnight, yet both populations remained on high alert of another all-out conflict between Israel and Hamas.
“War is coming. I know that the (Israeli) occupation is carrying out raids to pave the way with their home base,” Somaya Rabaya, 21, from Deir Al-Balah in central Gaza, said.
While the cease-fire deal included an end to rockets and mortars, it didn’t include a commitment by Hamas to stop what Israeli media have dubbed “terror kites,” a senior Hamas source said.
In a brief statement on Saturday, Hamas spokesman Fawzi Barhoum said the movement accepted the cease-fire brokered by Egyptian and UN officials and that calm had been restored. Later, the Israeli military announced a return to civilian routine along the volatile border.
UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said he was “gravely concerned” about the escalation and called on both sides to step back from the prospect of another devastating conflict. “Any further escalation will endanger the lives of Palestinians and Israelis alike, deepen the humanitarian catastrophe in Gaza and undermine current efforts to improve livelihoods,” he said.
On Saturday morning in Gaza, 17-year-old Wissam was with a number of other youths fitting kites with small bottles full of diesel, while sheltering behind a sandbank for fear of Israeli strikes. “This morning, they bombed a Hamas observation post near here. I was afraid they would hit us with a missile,” he said.
Israel says it has no interest is engaging in another war with Hamas, but says it will no longer tolerate the Gaza militant campaign of flying the incendiary devices into Israel.
On Friday, Israel unleashed an offensive it says destroyed more than 60 Hamas targets, including three battalion headquarters.
“The attack delivered a severe blow to the Hamas’ training array, command and control abilities, weaponry, aerial defense and logistic capabilities along with additional military infrastructure,” the Israeli military said in a statement, adding that the strikes “will intensify as necessary.”