Five more charged in Tanzania for murder of anti-poaching activist

Wayne Lotter supported an elite Tanzanian anti-poaching unit that had a number of successful arrests in recent years. (PAMS Foundation)
Updated 23 February 2018
0

Five more charged in Tanzania for murder of anti-poaching activist

DAR ES SALAAM: Five more suspects were charged in a Tanzanian court on Friday for the murder of prominent conservationist Wayne Lotter, bringing to eight the total number of people arraigned over the killing.
Three other suspects were charged for the same crime in October last year.
Lotter, 51, co-founder of PAMS Foundation USA, a non governmental organization that supports anti-poaching efforts across Africa, was shot dead in Tanzania’s commercial capital Dar es Salaam on Aug. 16, 2017.
The five suspects charged yesterday include a Burundian national, Nduimana Jonas, 40, who is also known by the alias “the Priest,” according to court documents seen by Reuters.
The other suspects arraigned on Friday at the Kisutu Resident Magistrate’s Court are Tanzanian businessmen Godfrey Salamba, 42, Innocent Kimaro, 23, Chambie Ally, 32, and a local bank employee, Robert Mwaipyana, 31.
The three suspects charged last year for shooting dead the South African-born conservationist are bank employee Khalid Mwinyi, 33, his sister Rahma Mwinyi, 37, and a laborer, Mohamed Maganga, 61.
The suspects, who were charged with murder and conspiracy to commit murder, were not allowed to enter a plea until the case is transferred to the Tanzanian High Court, which has jurisdiction over murder cases.
The case was adjourned until March 6 when it is scheduled to come up for another mentioning.
Lotter supported an elite Tanzanian anti-poaching unit that has had a number of successful arrests in recent years, colleagues said.
He also worked on the Ivory Queen case, which saw Yang Feng Glan, a Chinese, charged with running a smuggling empire that stretched form East Africa to Asian markets. She denies the charges in a separate ongoing court case in Tanzania.
It was unclear if Lotter’s death was related to his work, colleagues said. His assailant reportedly stole his laptop, said two colleagues who declined to be named.
“We are relieved that some of the perpetrators responsible for his untimely death have been apprehended and are being brought to justice,” PAMS Foundation said in a statement.


Scientific study finds asylum seekers boosting European economies

Updated 28 min 41 sec ago
0

Scientific study finds asylum seekers boosting European economies

  • Asylum seekers contributed most to a country’s gross domestic product after three to seven years, the research found
  • The findings come amid a rise of anti-immigrant sentiment across Europe, where immigration peaked in 2015 with the arrival of more than a million refugees and migrants from the Middle East and Africa

NEW YORK: Asylum seekers moving to Europe have raised their adopted nations’ economic output, lowered unemployment and not placed a burden on public finances, scientists said on Wednesday.
An analysis of economic and migration data for the last three decades found asylum seekers added to gross domestic products and boosted net tax revenues by as much as 1 percent, said a study published in Science Advances by French economists.
The findings come amid a rise of anti-immigrant sentiment across Europe, where immigration peaked in 2015 with the arrival of more than a million refugees and migrants from the Middle East and Africa.
An annual report by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees released on Tuesday showed the global number of refugees grew by a record 2.9 million in 2017 to 25.4 million.
The research from 1985 to 2015 looked at asylum seekers — migrants who demonstrate a fear of persecution in their homeland in order to be resettled in a new country.
“The cliché that international migration is associated with economic ‘burden’ can be dispelled,” wrote the scientists from the French National Center for Scientific Research, the University of Clermont-Auvergne and Paris-Nanterre University.
The research analyzed data from Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Norway, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.
Asylum seekers contributed most to a country’s gross domestic product after three to seven years, the research found. They marginally lowered unemployment rates and had a near-zero impact of public finances, it said.
Greece, where the bulk of migrants fleeing civil war in Syria have entered Europe, was not included because fiscal data before 1990 was unavailable, it said.
Chad Sparber, an associate professor of economics at the US-based Colgate University, said the study was a reminder there is no convincing economic case against humanitarian migration.
But he warned against dismissing the views of residents who might personally feel a negative consequence of immigration.
“There are people who do lose or suffer,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.
“Immigration on balance is good,” he said. “But I still recognize that it’s not true for every person.”