US deportations targeting more people with no crime records

1 / 2
US Border Patrol agents body search undocumented immigrants from Central America after capturing them in a grapefruit orchard on Thursday near McAllen, Texas. (AFP)
2 / 2
Central American immigrants turn themselves in to Border Patrol agents on February 22, 2018 near McAllen, Texas. (AFP)
Updated 24 February 2018
0

US deportations targeting more people with no crime records

SAN DIEGO: New government figures show people arrested by deportation officers increasingly have no criminal backgrounds, reflecting the Trump administration’s commitment to cast a wider net in its push to expel people in the US illegally.
US Immigration and Customs Enforcement said Friday that 65 percent of the arrests its agents made from October to December were of people with criminal records.
That’s compared to 82 percent during the same period of 2016. Looked at another way, criminal arrests rose but arrests of non-criminals jumped at a much faster rate.
Overall, there were more than 39,000 deportation arrests from October to December, up from about 27,000 during the final full three months of the Obama administration.
The 43 percent surge in overall arrests is consistent with trends since Trump took office.


May to argue 2nd referendum would violate public trust

Updated 17 December 2018
0

May to argue 2nd referendum would violate public trust

LONDON: Prime Minister Theresa May is set to condemn calls for a second referendum on Britain’s departure from the European Union, saying it would do irreparable damage to trust in democracy.
In remarks released ahead of her speech in the House of Commons on Monday, May says that staging another referendum “would say to millions who trusted in democracy that our democracy does not deliver.”
She’s also expected to argue that such a ballot would exacerbate divisions rather than heal them.
May’s supporters distanced themselves from media reports that senior figures in her government held talks with opposition Labour lawmakers aimed at holding another vote.
With time growing short toward Britain’s scheduled March 29 departure, it remains unclear whether the country will leave with a deal or crash out with no deal.