Saudi Art Council exhibition presents 'Jina Min Al-Taif'

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A man showcases his calligraphy at the art exhibition. (AN Photo)
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Drums can be seen at the art exhibition. (AN Photo)
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The event shed light on the history as well as the culture of Taif in different forms of art, from music and calligraphy to photography and virtual reality. (AN Photo)
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The event shed light on the history as well as the culture of Taif in different forms of art, from music and calligraphy to photography and virtual reality. (AN Photo)
Updated 24 February 2018
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Saudi Art Council exhibition presents 'Jina Min Al-Taif'

JEDDAH: The 21,39 art exhibition turned the old, abandoned corners of the Pepsi Co. factory into a spectacular work of art through the sounds and colors of Taif’s rich culture on Friday. The event was to bring people together to celebrate and learn about the city.
“For us, old and abandoned is exactly what the Saudi Art Council looks for when it comes to activating and creating exhibitions because it may be dead for most people, but for us there is so much history here, and to have people come and visit is a rare opportunity,” Nada Sheikh-Yasin, manager at the Art Council, told Arab News when asked about the reason for choosing the location.
She explained that the event is new, and it is the last day the Pepsi Co. factory will hold an art exhibition.
The event sheds light on the history as well as the culture of Taif in different forms of art, from music and calligraphy to photography and virtual reality.
Locals and expatriates all gathered at the site to witness the event. “I think it’s a great event. We started off at the Saudi Art Council in Gold Moore, then came here tonight. It looks interesting and I highly recommend that everybody attends,” said Nati Marvidis, who attended the exhibition.
The event took off to the beautiful sound of the Oud (musical instrument), through the live performance of Sa’ad Al-Atif and his group. People enjoyed the music very much, clapped their hands, sang along and expressed their affiliation with Taif’s heritage.
Artist Sa’ad Al-Atif explained that the sound of Taif’s music is different from any other musical sound in the Kingdom. It has sounds specific to the city of Taif.
Taghreed Wazna, photographer and attendee, said: “It is the first time we have an event dedicated to the people of Taif, their culture, tradition and lifestyle. The rose factory was presented in a new and creative way by artist Hassan Mabrook. Many people here in Jeddah have no knowledge of the rose factory, and how they make rosewater and rose oil.”
She added: ”I have also discovered amazing photographs taken by photographers from the Association for Culture and Arts in Taif. This event taught me so much about Taif’s architecture, buildings, traditional music and dances.
“I would like to thank the Saudi Art Council for cooperating with the Association for Culture and Arts in Taif and their manager, artist Faisal Al-Khudaidi,” said Wazna.


King Salman’s support vital to national heritage achievements

The program aims to protect, promote and develop cultural heritage and make it part of the life and memory of citizens. (Supplied)
Updated 17 October 2018
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King Salman’s support vital to national heritage achievements

  • The Saudi leadership made key decisions to protect antiquities and historical sites
  • Saudi Arabia aims to conduct awareness campaigns, establish museums and develop them in a modern way to attract citizens and visitors

JEDDAH: The achievements made in Saudi Arabia’s national heritage sector, and the prizes and awards that have been won as result, are thanks to the support and efforts of King Salman, said Prince Sultan bin Salman, president of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH).
His comments came as the king received the Sharjah International Award for Cultural Heritage, which was awarded in recognition of the Custodian of The Two Holy Mosques cultural heritage program.
King Salman oversaw the creation of the antiquities and heritage sector 50 years ago and stood firmly against the elimination or extinction of archaeological and heritage sites, Prince Sultan said, and has made historical and important decisions to protect antiquities since the era of the late King Saud.
This support culminated in the adoption of the innovative Custodian of The Two Holy Mosques for the Care of Cultural Heritage program, implemented by the commission to bring about a qualitative shift in projects and programs devoted to national cultural heritage.
Prince Sultan said: “The award is a result of King Salman’s follow-up and support to the program, which the SCTH and our team have translated into projects and initiatives carried out in cooperation with highly professional partners, in order to preserve, restore and develop the national heritage and make it a reality that connects citizens to their country’s history and heritage.”
He said the SCTH has built upon the great efforts of the institutions that preceded it in taking care of the nation’s antiquities, as well as individual efforts to preserve national heritage.
“Today, we reap the fruits of these efforts: The culture we have learnt from King Salman and previous leaders, which has taught us to complete the work and loyalty of all those who built and achieved before us,” he said.
Dr. Sultan bin Mohammed Al-Qasimi, a member of the Federal Supreme Council and ruler of Sharjah, announced that the Sharjah International Award for Cultural Heritage had been awarded to the Custodian of The Two Holy Mosques Program for the Care of Cultural Heritage during a ceremony on April 22, 2018.
The program aims to protect, promote and develop cultural heritage and make it part of the life and memory of citizens. It also conducts awareness campaigns, establishes museums and develops them in a modern way to attract citizens and visitors, prepares Islamic historical sites to welcome visitors, and preserves culturally important buildings and towns to showcase the role of the Kingdom as a crossroads for civilizations through the ages and achieve a qualitative shift in the field, contributing to economic growth.