In year of #MeToo, women win big at Berlin filmfest

Director, screenwriter, editor and producer Adina Pintilie poses with her Golden Bear award for Best Film ‘Touch Me Not’ at the news conference after the awards ceremony at the 68th Berlinale International Film Festival in Berlin, Germany, February 24, 2018.(Reuters)
Updated 25 February 2018
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In year of #MeToo, women win big at Berlin filmfest

BERLIN: “Touch Me Not,” an experimental Romanian docudrama exploring intimacy and the fears around it, won the Golden Bear top prize at the Berlin film festival Saturday in a strong year for female filmmakers and women’s stories.
First-time director Adina Pintilie, 38, clutching the trophy after her surprise triumph, said the movie was intended to “invite you, the viewer, to dialogue” with its graphic portrayals of nudity and disability.
US filmmaker Wes Anderson clinched the best director Silver Bear prize for “Isle of Dogs,” an animated allegory with political bite and an early favorite among the 19 contenders.
Actor Bill Murray, who voices one of the pack of pooches in Anderson’s first animated feature since 2009’s “Fantastic Mr.Fox,” picked up the award for Anderson.
“I never thought that I would go to work as a dog and come home with a bear,” he quipped.
“Ich bin ein Berliner Hund (I am a Berlin dog),” he added, riffing on John F. Kennedy’s famous speech.
The runner-up Grand Jury Prize went to Polish social satire “Mug” by Malgorzata Szumowska, the second winner among four women in competition.
It tells the story of a man who is shunned by his community when he has a face transplant after a horrific accident, in a plot examining tensions over identity and exclusion in eastern Europe.
Szumowska said the film “reflected problems not only in my own country” but around the world.
“I am so happy that I am a female director, yeah!” she added.
France’s Anthony Bajon won best actor for an emotionally raw portrayal of a young man struggling to beat his drug addiction at a Catholic Alpine retreat in Cedric Kahn’s “The Prayer.”
“Museum” from Mexico, starring Gael Garcia Bernal in the true story of a daring 1985 heist by two students at the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City, bagged the best screenplay award.
Austria’s “The Waldheim Waltz” by Ruth Beckermann about the scandal surrounding the Nazi past of former UN Secretary General Kurt Waldheim claimed the best documentary prize.
Despite critical accolades, wrenching drama “U-July 22” about the mass murder of 69 mainly teenage victims on the Norwegian island of Utoya by far-right militant Anders Behring Breivik in 2011, left the ceremony empty-handed.
In a year in which the #MeToo movement cast a long shadow over the Berlinale, with several topical films screened and a raft of industry initiatives launched to combat sexual exploitation and discrimination, women proved to be the big winners.
“Touch Me Not,” which also picked up the best first feature prize, shows Pintilie on screen interviewing a range of protagonists about their intimate lives.
Film industry bible Variety called the movie “divisive” but praised its refreshing approach to standards of beauty and “normal” sexuality.
“If anyone is shocked by ‘Touch Me Not’ they’re not getting the point,” its reviewer said.
Pintilie, the sixth woman to the Berlinale in its 68-year history, admitted that the film might make many viewers uncomfortable but called it a “necessary” provocation.
“The fear of the other is growing and there is so much conflict all over the world,” she told reporters.
“The film is an invitation to empathy and to embrace otherness and to reconsider everything that you know.”
Last year, a tender Hungarian love story set in a slaughterhouse, “On Body and Soul” by Ildiko Enyedi, captured the top prize and is now nominated for a best foreign language film Oscar.


Traveling back thousands of years by reviving KSA's Al-Ula

Archaeological treasures in the northwestern region of the Kingdom are older than Saudi Arabia itself, and barely known to the world. (AFP)
Updated 27 min 59 sec ago
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Traveling back thousands of years by reviving KSA's Al-Ula

  • The RCU is joining forces with the Arab World Institute in Paris to produce a touring exhibition

JEDDAH: Bathing in the scorching sun of Saudi Arabia for the past 4,000 years and sitting among the sandy dunes of the northwestern region of the Kingdom, lie the country’s archaeological treasures. These treasures are even older than Saudi Arabia itself, and barely known to the world.
The area covers about 52 hectares of well-preserved land in which there are tombs handcrafted out of the rocks, relics from ancient civilizations such as the Greeks and the Romans, archaeological riches dating back 4,000 years and other priceless artifacts from the Ottoman Empire.
The somewhat forgotten land is going to be brought into the spotlight by the year 2020 as a historic collaboration takes place between Saudi Arabia and France.
France excels in the art of preserving history so it is the perfect alliance to meet the goals of making Al-Ula a tourist attraction.
Saudis are cooperating with France in preserving and promoting culture and archaeology.
The French consider this project so prestigious that Gerard Mestrallet, a special envoy of the president, has been appointed for Al-Ula. Both countries share a common approach to national heritage; that culture transcends all borders and should be accessible to all who seek to observe history.
The agreement was signed in the presence of Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and French President Emmanuel Macron as well as Al-Ula governor, the special envoy to Al-Ula and France’s foreign minister. Against the walls of Paris’s Musee De Arts Decoratifs — a wing of the Louvre Palace — sit the illuminated sandstones for the French to experience a sliver of Saudi Arabia’s rich heritage. The Royal Commission of Al-Ula (RCU) has signed an agreement with Campus France, described as the leading international academic and vocational public institution in France, to train young Saudi women and men to become aspiring archaeologists.
The RCU is joining forces with the Arab World Institute in Paris to produce a touring exhibition. Public transport, hotels and restaurants are also part of the plan.
More than 2,100 people applied for traineeships: 200 young Saudi men and women will be trained by the most prestigious institutes in the world; part of the 1.2 million new tourist jobs are expected to be created under Vision 2030.
Cutting-edge technologies and methods such as aerial LiDAR (light detection and ranging), scanning and photos taken from light aircraft, helicopter and drones will also be used.