Arab-origin, Muslim models take over runways at Milan Fashion Week

Amina Adan and Halima Aden walked the runway for Max Mara. (@amina_adan)
Updated 25 February 2018
0

Arab-origin, Muslim models take over runways at Milan Fashion Week

DUBAI: From Somali-American star Halima Aden to lesser known beauty Amina Adan, hijab-wearing models and beauties of Arab descent are taking Milan Fashion Week by storm.
Both models walked for Max Mara in the brand’s Autumn/Winter 2018 show on Thursday, alongside such fashion stars as Gigi Hadid and Cindy Crawford’s daughter, Kaia Gerber.
Aden sported a silky headscarf and skirt-and-trousers combination while Adan, who was raised in Denmark, showed off a grey checkered blazer paired with a black leopard-print scarf.
After the show, Adan took to her Instagram page to thank Max Mara for the experience, posting: “Thank you for this amazing experience, @maxmara.”
Far from being the only Muslim models to take Milan by storm, the pair were joined in the fashion-forward city by models-of-the-moment Gigi and Bella Hadid, both of whom walked in a variety of shows, including Missoni, Versace and Alberta Ferretti.

Thank you for this amazing experience @maxmara #Aminainmilan

A post shared by Amina Adan (@amina_adan) on

For her part, Imaan Hammam, a Dutch model of Egyptian and Moroccan descent, walked the runway for Versace on Friday, dressed in a figure-hugging, belted black mini-dress.

Backstage @versace

A post shared by Imaan Hammam (@imaanhammam) on

However, despite the two hijab-clad models and litany of international names garnering praise from pro-diversity fashion insiders, some critics are slamming Italian fashion house Gucci for outfitting white models with headscarves and turbans in the brand’s Feb. 22 show.
Actor and model Avan Jogia sparked debate on Twitter after he tweeted a photo of a white model wearing a turban, saying: “Yo, @gucci... I mess with you guys... but this isn’t a good look for you... could you not find a brown model?”
Meanwhile, fashion photographer Faiyaz Kolia told Indie magazine that “Gucci got to pick and choose from cultural imagery all the things that are aligned to their ‘fantasy’ narrative without any consequences, and then so easily put on white skin… What message does that send? That it’s ok to wear a hijab if you’re young, beautiful, rich, and white but not if you’re actually a Muslim or a person of color?”


Saudi fashion label puts women in limelight

Renad Hefni showcases her brand Royaled collection. Her bold spring/summer collection aims to make women feel powerful and confident.( Photo/Supplied)
Updated 19 July 2018
0

Saudi fashion label puts women in limelight

  • In 2018, Saudi Arabia hosted its first Fashion Week in Riyadh and also made history by lifting its driving ban on women.
  • Renad Hefni won the Women Appreciation Month fashion award created by Femi9fashion brand in Jeddah

JEDDAH: Fashion and couture are on the rise in Saudi Arabia with the increase in young Saudi fashion icons and the growth of the creative community.

In 2018, the Kingdom hosted its first Fashion Week in Riyadh and also made history by lifting its driving ban on women.

With the growth of female empowerment in Kingdom, Renad Hefni, a fashion designer and graduate of Dar Al-Hekma University, began her brand Royaled to empower young women in the country. 

Hefni believes that “changing someone’s appearance can lead to changing people’s attitude toward one another.” Her brand celebrates female power.

“Royaled looks to celebrate every woman who treasures her character by crowning her with a virtual crown and a throne fit for the queen aura that radiates with inspiration. Jeweled with grace, charm and confidence,” she said.

Hefni told Arab News that to her the crown represents power, victory and glory. “It symbolizes leadership to closely align the women of the 21st century with their rights of passage to confidence and influence.”

She believes Royaled will stand out to young Saudi women as it represents their need to thrive and conquer.

“When everyone started to see the brand, they understood the message completely — from the logo to the slogan to all the crowns placed on every garment. Being recognized, understood and appreciated for why I became a designer is my proudest achievement,” Hefni said.

She promotes women’s rights through her fashion label. One of her collections, titled “Enthrone,” consists of half garments to let women feel that “they are the missing beautiful piece in every garment.”

Hefni won the Women Appreciation Month fashion award created by Femi9fashion brand in Jeddah.

Royaled has already made a name for itself with two fashion shows in Dubai and more to come. Royaled has a broad vision for the future.

“Our vision is to reach a wider audience in different countries and to dress some of the most powerful and well-known women. Royaled looks to expand its target market and reach international fashion weeks.” The brand has launched its spring/summer collection “The Ruler.” 

Inspired by the 1980s hiphop style mixed with Middle Eastern glam, the collection reminds women “of their power and confidence, creating a movement, an army of strong and capable women,” reads a post shared on the brand’s Instagram page.

UAE-Yemeni singer Balqees Fathi appeared in a video clip wearing Royaled’s tower collar vest.

Royaled was established in 2015 — it is a new name that has made big steps. See the brand’s page on Instagram: @RoyaledbyRH.