Egypt set to build world’s largest solar park: Reports

File photo of solar plants (REUTERS)
Updated 25 February 2018

Egypt set to build world’s largest solar park: Reports

Egypt is currently constructing what is set to become the world’s largest solar park. Authorities hope the park will produce something between 1.6-2.0GW of solar power by the middle of 2019, according to local reports.
The Benban solar park is located near Aswan and aims to increase Egypt’s energy generation capacity. It is named after a Nile River village close to the power plant in the Eastern region of the Sahara Desert.
The ambitious project could transform Egypt into a major solar energy player in the world.
The solar park will be given a 25 year contract to sell its electricity at 7.8 cents per kWh to the the state-owned Egyptian Electricity Transmission Company (EETC) and pegged to the value of the US dollar.
So far, 29 projects have received financing of at least $1.8 billion. They represent almost 1.5GW of solar power to be produced on the 14.3 square-mile plot of land.
Egyptian officials believe the renewable energy project will produce 20 percent of Egypt’s power by 2020, and will serve 350,000 Egyptians and provide eco-friendly and cost-efficient power.


Syria Kurds hand over four Daesh-linked children to Germany

Updated 32 min 21 sec ago

Syria Kurds hand over four Daesh-linked children to Germany

  • They included a boy and two sisters who had lost both parents, and a fatherless girl infant
  • A spokeswoman for the German foreign ministry confirmed the handover to staff from its consulate

SIMALKA CROSSING: The Kurdish authorities in northeast Syria on Monday handed over four children linked with the Daesh group to Germany, their first such repatriation to the European country, an official said.
“The autonomous region handed over four children from Daesh families to a delegation from Germany,” said Fanar Kaeet, a foreign affairs official with the Kurdish authorities.
They included a boy and two sisters who had lost both parents, and a fatherless girl infant who was repatriated for health reasons, Kurdish authorities said.
All are under 10 years old, they said.
A spokeswoman for the German foreign ministry confirmed the handover to staff from its consulate in neighboring Iraqi Kurdistan at the Simalka border crossing.
“I can confirm that four children who were in custody in northern Syria were able to leave Syria,” she said.
“The children were received on the Iraqi-Syrian border by staff of the consulate in Irbil and will be given to family members,” the spokeswoman said.
“From there, the children and their family members will, we believe, travel to Germany.”
Syria’s Kurds have spearheaded the US-backed fight against Daesh in Syria, and in March expelled the extremists from their last patch of territory in the war-torn country’s far east.
Even as they fight remaining sleeper cells, thousands of alleged Daesh fighters and family members are being held in their custody.
These include hundreds of suspected foreign fighters in their jails, and thousands of their alleged family members in overcrowded camps.
Western countries have been largely reluctant to repatriate their nationals.
But France and Belgium have brought a handful of orphans home, while the United States last year repatriated a woman with her four children.
Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Kosovo have repatriated dozens of women and children.
Daesh overran large parts of Syria and Iraq in 2014, proclaiming a “caliphate” there, but offensives in both countries have seen them lose that territory.
A dozen children of alleged jihadist fighters have been repatriated from Iraq to Germany since March.