Huawei launches new tablet in flagship phone hiatus

Huawei CEO Richard Yu gives a press conference to present the new Huawei Balong 5G01, a 3GPP 5G commercial chipset on February 25, 2018 in Barcelona, on the eve of the inauguration of the Mobile World Congress (MWC). (AFP)
Updated 25 February 2018
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Huawei launches new tablet in flagship phone hiatus

BARCELONA: China’s Huawei launched a new laptop and tablet on Sunday as it seeks to cement its place among the world’s three biggest electronic device manufacturers.
The laptop, the Matebook X Pro, and the tablet, the MediaPad M5, were presented on the eve of the opening of the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona — the scene of previous major Huawei launches.
But this year the company will instead present its new flagship smartphone — the P20 — on March 27 in Paris, in what is seen as a bid not to be eclipsed by Samsung’s launch of its new top end phone later Sunday.
“By launching the new P20 smartphones only a month later in Paris, Huawei will be able to fine tune its marketing message based on how the new Samsung S9 devices are perceived by consumers,” said Forrester analyst Thomas Husson.
Both the new Huawei laptop and tablet feature long lasting batteries and quicker charge times and are available in grey and silver.
The laptop’s power button doubles as a fingerprint scanner, which Huawei says will start and securely log into Windows in under eight seconds.
Huawei also unveiled what it said is the world’s first commercial chipset that meets the standards of the super-fast 5G wireless networks which are poised to start being rolled out.
The company said the chipset can hit download speeds of 2.3 gigabits per second, significantly faster than speeds reached in current 4G networks.
Huawei remained the world’s third biggest seller of smartphones in 2017, behind Samsung and Apple.
It boasted a 10.4 percent market share, up from 9.5 percent, according to research firm IDC.
Samsung had a 21.6 percent share while Apple held 14.7 percent.


Google chief trusts AI makers to regulate the technology

Updated 13 December 2018
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Google chief trusts AI makers to regulate the technology

  • Tech companies building AI should factor in ethics early in the process to make certain artificial intelligence with “agency of its own” doesn’t hurt people, Pichai said
  • Google vowed not to design or deploy AI for use in weapons, surveillance outside of international norms, or in technology aimed at violating human rights

SAN FRANCISCO: Google chief Sundar Pichai said fears about artificial intelligence are valid but that the tech industry is up to the challenge of regulating itself, in an interview published on Wednesday.
Tech companies building AI should factor in ethics early in the process to make certain artificial intelligence with “agency of its own” doesn’t hurt people, Pichai said in an interview with the Washington Post.
“I think tech has to realize it just can’t build it, and then fix it,” Pichai said. “I think that doesn’t work.”
The California-based Internet giant is a leader in the development of AI, competing in the smart software race with titans such as Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, IBM and Facebook.
Pichai said worries about harmful uses of AI are “very legitimate” but that the industry should be trusted to regulate its use.
“Regulating a technology in its early days is hard, but I do think companies should self-regulate,” he said.
“This is why we’ve tried hard to articulate a set of AI principles. We may not have gotten everything right, but we thought it was important to start a conversation.”
Google in June published a set of internal AI principles, the first being that AI should be socially beneficial.
“We recognize that such powerful technology raises equally powerful questions about its use,” Pichai said in a memo posted with the principles.
“As a leader in AI, we feel a deep responsibility to get this right.”
Google vowed not to design or deploy AI for use in weapons, surveillance outside of international norms, or in technology aimed at violating human rights.
The company noted that it would continue to work with the military or governments in areas such as cybersecurity, training, recruitment, health care, and search-and-rescue.
AI is already used to recognize people in photos, filter unwanted content from online platforms, and enable cars to drive themselves.
The increasing capabilities of AI have triggered debate about whether computers that could think for themselves would help cure the world’s ills or turn on humanity as has been depicted in science fiction works.