Iran’s ex-intelligence minister slams handling of prison death

Kavous Seyed Emami
Updated 25 February 2018
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Iran’s ex-intelligence minister slams handling of prison death

TEHRAN: An ex-intelligence minister in Iran on Sunday criticized the handling of an environmentalist’s death in prison, saying the public would not believe he was a spy unless the case was handled by a “competent agency.”
Ali Younessi, who was intelligence minister under President Mohammad Khatami between 2000 and 2005, shone a rare light on the turf war between Iran’s multiple security agencies in his interview with the daily Iran newspaper.
He referred to the case of Kavous Seyed Emami, 63, the Iranian-Canadian citizen who founded the Persian Heritage Wildlife Foundation. He died in prison this month after being arrested along with seven members of his NGO on espionage charges.
“Unfortunately the Intelligence Ministry has no jurisdiction over this case,” said Younessi, who now serves as an adviser to President Hassan Rouhani on minority religious affairs.
“I believe the case should be given to the Intelligence Ministry ... Given the events that have occurred, if a competent and legal agency does not intervene and doesn’t give its opinion on the dead individual or those under arrest, public opinion will not believe they are spies even if they are convicted.”
The authorities say Emami committed suicide, but the family have questioned the verdict and say they were threatened by security forces.
Younessi did not name the agency running the case, but the Revolutionary Guards run a powerful intelligence service that is separate from the Intelligence Ministry.
Younessi also gave details of the infamous case of Zahra Kazemi, an Iranian-Canadian photographer who died from head injuries after being arrested for taking photos outside Evin prison in 2003.
“The prosecutor at the time insisted she was a spy,” he said, referring to the notorious Tehran prosecutor Said Mortazavi, who was last year jailed for his part in another custodial death during protests in 2009.
“We sent two counter-espionage experts from the ministry to investigate this woman in a hotel. After the interview, the two experts concluded that from a technical and scientific standpoint, Zahra Kazemi was not a spy,” said Younessi.
But Mortazavi refused to listen to their verdict, he said, and handed the case back to the police.
In Younessi’s version of events, Kazemi, who was 54, died from a brain haemorrhage caused at the moment of her arrest.
She “was beaten because she refused to hand over her items and her head hit a concrete road divider, which caused a haemorrhage,” he said.
That goes against statement from the government at the time, which said Kazemi was violently beaten in prison. The judiciary initially claimed she died of a stroke and only later that she was injured in a fall.


Australia recognizes west Jerusalem as capital of Israel

Updated 15 December 2018
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Australia recognizes west Jerusalem as capital of Israel

  • The prime minister is also committed to recognizing a future state of Palestine with east Jerusalem as its capital when the city’s status is determined in a peace deal
  • The embassy will be moved to west Jerusalem, and defense and trade offices will also be established

SYDNEY: Australia now recognizes west Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Saturday, but a contentious embassy shift from Tel Aviv will not occur until a peace settlement is achieved.
Morrison is also committed to recognizing a future state of Palestine with east Jerusalem as its capital when the city’s status is determined in a peace deal.
“Australia now recognizes west Jerusalem — being the seat of the Knesset and many of the institutions of government — is the capital of Israel,” Morrison said in a speech in Sydney on Saturday.
“And we look forward to moving our embassy to west Jerusalem when practical, in support of and after final status of determination,” he said, adding that work on a new site for the embassy was under way.
In the interim, Morrison said, Australia would establish a defense and trade office in the west of the holy city.
“Furthermore, recognizing our commitment to a two-state solution, the Australian government is also resolved to acknowledge the aspirations of the Palestinian people for a future state with its capital in east Jerusalem,” he added.
Both Israel and the Palestinians claim Jerusalem as their capital.
Most foreign nations have avoided moving embassies there to prevent inflaming peace talks on the city’s final status — until US President Trump unilaterally moved the US embassy there earlier this year.
Morrison first floated a shift in foreign policy in October, which angered Australia’s immediate neighbor Indonesia — the world’s most populous Muslim nation.
The issue has put a halt on years-long negotiations on a bilateral trade deal.
Canberra on Friday told its citizens traveling to Indonesia to “exercise a high degree of caution,” warning of protests in the Indonesian capital Jakarta and popular holiday hotspots, including Bali.
Morrison said it was in Australia’s interests to support “liberal democracy” in the Middle East, and took aim at the United Nations he said was a place Israel is “bullied.”