Henna art a big hit among Janadriyah’s female visitors

Henna art is an ancient tradition, which continues to be popular among women in the Middle East and the subcontinent. Henna is a herbal dye used for temporary tattooing. (SPA)
Updated 26 February 2018
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Henna art a big hit among Janadriyah’s female visitors

RIYADH: Women visiting the Janadriyah festival flocked to the Eastern Province’s pavilion to have their hands decorated with beautiful henna designs by Maryam Al-Shrida.
Henna art is an ancient tradition, which continues to be popular among women in the Middle East and the subcontinent. Its popularity has now even reached the West. Henna is a herbal dye used for temporary tattooing.
Al-Shrida turns the hands of her clients into works of art, reflecting a hobby and a craft passed down to her from her mother.
She also introduced some modern modifications to her henna designs.
“Henna is used for treating hair and skin diseases and for cosmetic purposes, like dyeing the hair and the skin,” she explained.
According to Al-Shrida, women adore henna designs, which come in many types — Indian mehndi, Sudanese, Emirati, Bahraini, Moroccan, and many others.
“Most young women prefer simple designs, Indian designs, flowers, bracelet designs, and letters, as well as having their names written on their palms,” she said, “especially during Eid holidays and weddings.”
Al-Shrida added: “Most women prefer to mix henna with other ingredients, such as sugar, Prunus mahaleb, vinegar, orange juice, lemon juice, coffee, oil, and others, in order to create the desired color or create a hair mask.”
She pointed out henna used for drawing body art is usually prepared using ground green henna, lemon juice, and ground sugar.


Saudi Arabian female accident inspectors gear up ahead of lifting of ban

Updated 3 min ago
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Saudi Arabian female accident inspectors gear up ahead of lifting of ban

JEDDAH: A batch of 40 Saudi women will begin their careers as car accident inspectors on Sunday in Riyadh, Jeddah and Dammam as the ban on women driving is lifted.
Private insurance company Najm, in partnership with the General Department of Traffic, has hired 40 women and provided them with training to respond to road accidents involving female drivers.
Inspector Amira Abdul Aziz Al-Enezi from Riyadh told Arab News: “As Saudi women, we can play a vital role in managing and responding to accidents, supporting women drivers, and contributing to raising awareness about traffic safety.”
Inspector Mada Hassan Hamza from Dammam was enthusiastic about her new role. She said she hoped to make a valuable contribution. “We are qualified enough to perform our jobs perfectly.”
“We invite all Saudi women to join Najm because it provides a unique opportunity to manage and address traffic accidents and conduct field trials,” she said.
Suha Abdullah Al-Abdulwahid, another Najm inspector, said: “I am proud to be the member of the first batch of female Najm inspectors.”
She hopes the number of women inspectors will increase gradually.