Milan’s wacky, wonderful fashion week closes on quiet note

A model wears a creation from Ujoh women’s Fall/Winter 2018-2019 collection, presented during the Milan Fashion Week. (AP Photo)
Updated 26 February 2018
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Milan’s wacky, wonderful fashion week closes on quiet note

MILAN: After Gucci’s heads and Dolce & Gabbana’s drones, Milan Fashion Week wrapped up Monday on a tranquil note with shows by Japanese designers.
The six days of previews for next fall and winter is likely to be the most talked-about in a long time. Gucci’s Alessandro Michele’s message reverberated well beyond fashion world’s epicenter when on Day 1, he sent out two models carrying replicas of their own heads through a pristine operating room backdrop. And the fashion crowd was awestruck on the penultimate day when Dolce & Gabbana unveiled their latest handbag, flown down the runway by a bunch of drones.
These houses are providing master classes in how to grab the attention of the new consumers. The trick remains to stay true to the brand’s traditions and DNA — something being undertaken by new and new-ish designers at Ferragamo, Roberto Cavalli, Marni and Jil Sander.
One of the highlights from Monday was Mitsuru Nishizaki’s latest Ujoh collection combining British-inspired check, plaid and stripe fabrics with his own trademark asymmetrical and layered silhouette. It was the Tokyo-based designer’s third year showing in Milan.
Trousers got an update with mix-matched tapered legs, one in black, one in a red burgundy, with an asymmetrical button closure. The look is layered with a tunic-style sweater.
The attention to detail and workmanship come through in an off-the-shoulder black dress with a ruffled hem decorated with a field of blue embroidered flowers that continue into lacy 3-D adornments.
Nishizaki has tapped the Milan trend of wrapping, with knitwear that bunches and hugs the frame, and large oversized wraps that fasten over the shoulder with a leather strap. One in British plaid is covered with lurex intarsia.
Another Monday highlight was Atsushi Nakashima, who debuted his first collection in Milan last year and sees similarities between Milan and Tokyo, in that both cities cherish and pass on traditions.
He stays close to his native Japan, however, when sourcing textiles. They included a double-face patchwork of panels that read inside and out, including washing instructions and instructions for wearing hoods.
The mixed men’s and women’s collection included a series of trenches, bombers and duffel coats in khaki and olive green, and his-and-hers matching sweatshirts with neon lizards, worn under suspenders.


Startup of the Week: Fusion of different world cultures

Updated 18 December 2018
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Startup of the Week: Fusion of different world cultures

  • The Boho Factory aims to fuse unique designs and trends from different cultures around the world with the Saudi culture

The Bohemian or boho clothing style is fast gaining popularity in the Kingdom. It is a beautiful fusion of authentic hippie gypsy style and many other cultures from around the world particularly African and Indian.
The word bohemian describes the non-traditional way of living. It first appeared in the English language in the 19th century.
The media revolution has given rise to a new global culture without any boundaries. The youth around the world today think more globally than their predecessors and Saudi youngsters are no exception.
Two Saudi sisters, Lujain and Sara Al-Nahdi, teamed up to create a new Saudi boho brand called “The Boho Factory” in April 2018.
The Jeddah-based sisters began their venture with the slogan “All things bohemian.” They offer a wide variety of bohemian designs with embroidery and embellishments on shirts, jackets, beachwear, Ramadan thobes, trousers, clutches, bags, sandals and earrings.
Most of their products are comfortable and stylish and represent the fast-evolving modern global culture.
Lujain said: “Growing up in a family that loves traveling and discovering new exotic destinations, instilled in us a passion for culture, unity and appreciation of beauty through communities across the globe.’’
The Boho Factory aims to fuse unique designs and trends from different cultures around the world with the Saudi culture.
“As a Saudi Arabia-based brand, we wish to share stories about the Saudi culture with the world. Our next collection of clothing will embody Saudi tribal and Bedouin designs.”
The creative duo wants to introduce the world’s authentic designs and cultures to Saudis and to serve as a bridge between different cultures and communities using the fashion industry.
The Saudi sisters are eager to showcase the beauty of a diverse world through their designs to reflect the lavish yet simple concepts in fashion.
Lujain said: “We are constantly eager to reflect the universal beauty and connection through our clothing lines and vibes.’’
The Boho Factory provides unique designs of Wayuu bags and embroidered denim jackets.
Lojain said: “Some designs are designed locally in-house by us and some are designed in collaboration with artisans and communities who reside across different continents.”
They believe that a clothing line that has a story to tell and can identify with a culture can conquer hearts everywhere. What distinguishes the bohemian style from other styles is the way it associates with exotic locations and festival dresses, it suits all seasons of the year but is often suitable for the summer and spring, seasons of bright, vibrant and rich colors.
The sisters use integrated designs from Colombia, Thailand, Mexico and India, which include the use of authentic textiles, symbols and colors representing each country and more importantly the bohemian vibes.
With the exotic, carefully handmade designs the Boho Factory takes one to places; from the Far West to the Far East.
The store is planning to expand its reach by displaying its products on different e-commerce platforms.