Australia media firms join fight against Rebel Wilson’s record $3.6m defamation payout

The Supreme Court of Victoria found that Rebel Wilson missed out on Hollywood roles as a result of a string of articles. (Reuters)
Updated 27 February 2018
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Australia media firms join fight against Rebel Wilson’s record $3.6m defamation payout

SYDNEY: Australian media companies on Monday sought to join German magazine publisher Bauer Media in fighting a record A$4.56 million ($3.6 million) defamation payout to Hollywood actress Rebel Wilson, arguing it set a dangerous precedent.
The Australian arm of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp, Fairfax Media Ltd, Seven West Media Ltd. and Nine Entertainment Co. Holdings Ltd. and the Australian Broadcasting Corp. filed a joint motion to “intervene” in the case, a lawyer representing the companies said.
The move is a rare show of unity in an industry increasingly divided along political lines. In 2017, a court awarded the “Pitch Perfect” Sydney-born star the country’s highest defamation payout, smashing the A$389,000 maximum, by using the actress’s global reach to justify a “special” damages payment.
The Supreme Court of Victoria found that Wilson missed out on Hollywood roles as a result of a string of articles published by Bauer which claimed Wilson lied about her age, real name and some childhood events, even after it knew the allegations were false.
In Australian law, companies are allowed to seek permission to intervene in a case if they believe the outcome affects their business directly. If allowed, they get to argue their case, separate from the plaintiff and the defendant, during a hearing.


Police visit ‘Saturday Night Live’ star after Instagram post

Updated 16 December 2018
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Police visit ‘Saturday Night Live’ star after Instagram post

  • Earlier this month, the comedian wrote on Instagram that he has spoken about borderline personality disorder from which he says he suffers
  • A police spokesman declined to say where officers met with Ariana Grande’s ex-fiance on Saturday

NEW YORK: New York City police were concerned about Pete Davidson after he wrote “I don’t want to be on this earth anymore” on Instagram. And they visited the “Saturday Night Live” star to make sure he was OK.
A police spokesman declined to say where officers met with Ariana Grande’s ex-fiance on Saturday. But his Instagram posting was deleted and NBC did not cancel its live show.
What alarmed Davidson’s fans and authorities was the tone of the entertainer’s post: “I’m doing my best to stay here for you but I actually don’t know how much longer I can last. All I’ve ever tried to do was help people. Just remember I told you so.” He added a heart emoji.
Social media erupted with words of love for the 25-year-old comedian and native New Yorker who first appeared on “Saturday Night Live” in 2014. And his name is trending on Twitter.
One admirer tweeted “hang in there. There is a lot of help out here. Surrender to some love ... I’m praying for you Pete. I’ve been there. It gets better.”
Earlier this month, Davidson wrote on Instagram that he has spoken about borderline personality disorder from which he says he suffers, “and being suicidal publicly only in the hopes that it will help bring awareness and help kids like myself who don’t want to be on this earth.
“No matter how hard the Internet or anyone tries to make me kill myself. I won’t. I’m upset I even have to say this.”
Davidson and Grande were engaged in June, but broke up earlier this fall.
In November, Davidson apologized for mocking the appearance of a veteran who lost an eye in Afghanistan.
He said Lt. Com. Dan Crenshaw, now a congressman-elect from Texas, “deserves all the respect in the world.”
On SNL’s “Weekend Update” segment , Davidson was joined by Crenshaw, a Navy SEAL.
Davidson had mocked Crenshaw a week earlier, saying viewers might be surprised he’s “not a hit man in a porno movie.”
Crenshaw, a Republican who won a House seat in the 2018 midterm elections, took some joking shots at Davidson. And when his cellphone rang, the tone was “Breathin” by Grande.
Crenshaw got serious at the end, encouraging civilians and veterans to connect and paying tribute to heroes like Davidson’s father, a firefighter who died in the 9/11 terror attacks.