Lebanese fashion star Lana El-Sahely braves the cold for Dior’s Paris show

Lebanese fashion blogger Lana El-Sahely poses for a photo-call before the Christian Dior's 2018/2019 fall/winter collection fashion show on February 27, 2018 in Paris. (AFP)
Updated 28 February 2018
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Lebanese fashion star Lana El-Sahely braves the cold for Dior’s Paris show

PARIS: The subzero temperatures didn’t dampen Paris Fashion Week, which began with dark 80s atmospherics at Saint Laurent and a bright flower-power ode to female empowerment from Dior.
The event even saw Middle Eastern fashion stars brave the cold to see the new collection, with Lebanese fashion blogger Lana El-Sahely posing for photographers before the show.
Gabriella Wilde’s frayed silk Dior skirt was a little too diaphanous for the Paris winter weather. The British actress shivered at the Dior photo call before she quickly ducked inside to join Cara Delevingne and Dylan Penn.
A heaving mass of celebrities, editors and photographers soon thawed guests that had arrived at Paris’ Rodin Museum to see Dior designer Maria Grazia Chiuri’s latest artistic production.
The venue was emblazoned with mantras such as Hillary Clinton’s “Women’s Rights Are Human Rights,” providing a clue that Chiuri — the fashion house’s first female chief — would press ahead with the feminist themes that have proved the best-sellers from her previous collections.
The show — a brightly colored, patchwork-rich ode to flower-power, female empowerment and the ‘60s — didn’t disappoint. Orange shades and peaked dark cap hats mixed with check menswear jackets and assertive black thigh-high biker boots.
Abundant woolen looks — like a thick knit maroon dress with a cinched waist — captured the age of the awakening of women’s lib. And flowers were ubiquitous.
The program notes said Tuesday’s Dior collection marks 50 years since 1968 — the turning point of the civil rights movement — and the way in which Vogue magazine under Diana Vreeland mirrored that shift in a “sartorial revolution.”
The last look — a psychedelic column dress with embroidered tulle blooms in traffic-stopping reds, blues and yellow — took the concept of flower power into a whole new gear.


MUSE: Rawan bin Hussain talks social media stardom

Updated 20 September 2018
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MUSE: Rawan bin Hussain talks social media stardom

  • Rawan Bin Hussain is one of the largest influencers in the region
  • Aside from launching a lipstick line, the Kuwaiti blogger studies law in London

DUBAI: The Kuwaiti influencer, who has 3 million Instagram followers, talks about studying law, learning to fly and why gender biases are ‘so 1800s’

Being a fashion blogger is not the opposite of being a lawyer – they don’t conflict. I didn’t leave law behind. I’m still studying it. I could have moved to Dubai and made millions a month like other bloggers, but I’m not. I’m living in London making nothing a month because education comes first for me.
To show that lawyers don’t only fight for justice in court, but also in real life by giving back to the community, I launched a law association in Kuwait for female law students, law graduates and lawyers. If you have knowledge in the field of law, I want your experience and we can work together to do charity work and attend workshops.
I’ve always loved traveling around the world, so why not have my own license and my own airplane jetting around the world?
I don’t mind taking risks because I think people who don’t take risks are cowards. Life is fun, life is full of experiences, full of lessons. If you don’t fail and if you don’t learn from your mistakes, you won’t achieve anything in life. It doesn’t come on a plate of gold. You have to work for it.

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Happy to be here! @noorandzee

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A lot of people think that when you are a beauty icon, you are an empty head, empty-minded. We are not. A lot of bloggers are good mothers to their children, they are engineers, doctors, lawyers. They have a career, they just choose to do blogging, which is what they love, and I respect it because you should do what you love and love what you do.
We need to stop stereotyping, criticizing, judging based on the way she looks, the way she dresses, the way she appeals to others. I cannot please everybody as, most of all, I need to please myself.
I regret being too transparent sometimes. I am too spontaneous. I say my opinion in a very casual way – maybe I don’t think about the circumstances or the consequences. But if you don’t make mistakes, you don’t learn a lesson.  
We shouldn’t look as men as competition or a dangerous threat. We can work together to make this world a better place.
As a woman, I want to say look at me, I’m here. I can be a lawyer, a pilot, a public figure, an entrepreneur. I am capable of doing so many things. Men need to see that and respect that and not underestimate us because we are females. Judgment based on gender is so 1800s.