Lebanese fashion star Lana El-Sahely braves the cold for Dior’s Paris show

Lebanese fashion blogger Lana El-Sahely poses for a photo-call before the Christian Dior's 2018/2019 fall/winter collection fashion show on February 27, 2018 in Paris. (AFP)
Updated 28 February 2018
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Lebanese fashion star Lana El-Sahely braves the cold for Dior’s Paris show

PARIS: The subzero temperatures didn’t dampen Paris Fashion Week, which began with dark 80s atmospherics at Saint Laurent and a bright flower-power ode to female empowerment from Dior.
The event even saw Middle Eastern fashion stars brave the cold to see the new collection, with Lebanese fashion blogger Lana El-Sahely posing for photographers before the show.
Gabriella Wilde’s frayed silk Dior skirt was a little too diaphanous for the Paris winter weather. The British actress shivered at the Dior photo call before she quickly ducked inside to join Cara Delevingne and Dylan Penn.
A heaving mass of celebrities, editors and photographers soon thawed guests that had arrived at Paris’ Rodin Museum to see Dior designer Maria Grazia Chiuri’s latest artistic production.
The venue was emblazoned with mantras such as Hillary Clinton’s “Women’s Rights Are Human Rights,” providing a clue that Chiuri — the fashion house’s first female chief — would press ahead with the feminist themes that have proved the best-sellers from her previous collections.
The show — a brightly colored, patchwork-rich ode to flower-power, female empowerment and the ‘60s — didn’t disappoint. Orange shades and peaked dark cap hats mixed with check menswear jackets and assertive black thigh-high biker boots.
Abundant woolen looks — like a thick knit maroon dress with a cinched waist — captured the age of the awakening of women’s lib. And flowers were ubiquitous.
The program notes said Tuesday’s Dior collection marks 50 years since 1968 — the turning point of the civil rights movement — and the way in which Vogue magazine under Diana Vreeland mirrored that shift in a “sartorial revolution.”
The last look — a psychedelic column dress with embroidered tulle blooms in traffic-stopping reds, blues and yellow — took the concept of flower power into a whole new gear.


Beyoncé wears Tunisian-French design in viral video

Updated 20 June 2018
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Beyoncé wears Tunisian-French design in viral video

DUBAI: Beyoncé and Jay-Z stunned fans by dropping a surprise joint album this week, and the artistic video for the lead track, “Apes***,” sees the Grammy-winning queen of pop wearing a turban by French-Tunisian milliner Donia Allegue.

The nine-track album “Everything Is Love” dropped Saturday on the Tidal music streaming service that Jay-Z partially owns, before the couple released it on Spotify on Monday.
The pop diva and hip-hop superstar announced the album from the stage in London as they wrapped up the British leg that opened a global tour.

The couple also put out an elaborately choreographed video that takes place inside the Louvre museum in Paris for “Apes***,” AFP reported.

The video opens with the couple standing regally in front of the “Mona Lisa” — Jay-Z in a light green double-breasted suit, Beyoncé in a lavender pantsuit — and features a squad of scantily clad dancers moving sensually in front of Jacques Louis David’s “The Coronation of Napoleon.”

In a later scene, Beyoncé dons a floor-length black turban by Donia Allegue with a nude-colored bodysuit by French design house Cadolle. According to Vogue Arabia, Allegue revealed that the headpiece took eight hours to create and is made of six meters of tulle.

“Honored and proud to have adorned Queen @beyonce (with) an exceptional headpiece for her grandiose clip,” the design house posted on its Instagram page this week.

The video is a veritable treasure trove of sartorial high points chosen by stylist Zerina Akers, who scored the latest designs from international runways, as well as custom pieces from various high-end brands.

Fashion aside, the album, driven by warm, sultry soul with a largely hip-hop cadence, marries the styles of the two artists but is more consistent with the recent direction of Jay-Z.
The two stars have recorded together previously, notably on the Beyoncé-led single “Drunk in Love,” but the album comes after an especially public window into their marriage.
Beyonce on her last solo album “Lemonade” in 2016 revealed infidelity on the part of Jay-Z, who a year later asked forgiveness on his own album “4:44.”

This year, as the title of “Everything is Love” implies, their relationship is apparently swell.

On the final track, the joyously brassy “Lovehappy,” the two acknowledge past pain but also their efforts to reconcile.

“We’re flawed / But we’re still perfect for each other,” Beyoncé sings.

As two of the most prominent African Americans in pop culture Jay-Z and Beyoncé have played increasingly visible political roles, from campaigning for former president Barack Obama to championing the Black Lives Matter movement.

“Everything is Love” offers a paean to African American identity in “Black Effect,” which opens in Beyoncé fashion with a monologue about self-love before a haunting soul sample.
Jay-Z on the song name-checks Trayvon Martin, the 17-year-old African American shot dead in 2012 by a neighborhood watchman in a Florida gated community, and raps, in a twist on performers’ rote calls for crowd gesticulation, “Get your hands up high like a false arrest.”