Ford increasing production of new Lincoln Navigator, Ford Expedition

The company is using advanced manufacturing technologies and an upskilled workforce to increase line speed at its Kentucky Truck Plant.
Updated 01 March 2018
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Ford increasing production of new Lincoln Navigator, Ford Expedition

Ford is increasing production of two popular full-size SUVs to meet surging demand for both models ahead of their arrival in the Middle East. The Lincoln Navigator, the company’s new luxury SUV flagship, and the Ford Expedition have both undergone a complete redesign.
The company is using advanced manufacturing technologies and an upskilled workforce to increase line speed at its Kentucky Truck Plant to build even more Lincoln Navigator and Ford Expedition SUVs, boosting production targets approximately 25 percent since last fall when the SUVs hit the market.
A new $25 million investment for additional manufacturing enhancements brings Ford’s total investment at the Kentucky Truck Plant to $925 million and allows the company to increase manufacturing line speed.
This investment and advanced manufacturing upgrades are examples of the company’s quest to improve its operational fitness. Upgrades include 400 new robots, a new 3D printer that enables workers to make parts and tools more quickly and cheaper, as well as enhanced data analytics to keep the assembly line moving as efficiently as possible.
Crystal Worthem, Ford Middle East and Africa’s marketing director, said: “We knew that the Middle East would fall in love with the Expedition and Navigator — but we’ve been floored by the interest both all-new SUVs have had ahead of their arrival. Both have been tailored to deliver the best on- and off-road performance, power and capability for customers in a region where uncompromising dependability is essential.”
“Launching Lincoln’s flagship SUV in such a receptive market is incredibly exciting and we really can’t wait for the first customers to get their hands on theirs. For Ford, the all-new Expedition heads our robust SUV lineup, making it the freshest lineup of SUVs available in a highly competitive scene for 2018,” Worthem added.


New J-Clinic to harness machine learning tech

Updated 25 September 2018
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New J-Clinic to harness machine learning tech

MIT and Community Jameel, the social enterprise organization founded and chaired by Mohammed Abdul Latif Jameel ‘78, launched the Abdul Latif Jameel Clinic for Machine Learning in Health (J-Clinic) on Tuesday. This is the fourth major collaborative effort between MIT and Community Jameel.
J-Clinic, a key part of the MIT Quest for Intelligence, will focus on developing machine learning technologies to revolutionize the prevention, detection, and treatment of disease. It will concentrate on creating and commercializing high-precision, affordable, and scalable machine learning technologies in areas of health care ranging from diagnostics to pharmaceuticals, with three main areas of focus:
l Preventative medicine methods and technologies with the potential to change the course of non-infectious disease by stopping it in its tracks.
l Cost-effective diagnostic tests that may be able to both detect and alleviate health problems.
l Drug discovery and development to enable faster and cheaper discovery, development, and manufacture of new pharmaceuticals, particularly those targeted for individually customized therapies.
J-Clinic’s holistic approach will utilize MIT’s expertise in cellular and medical biology, computer science, engineering, and the social sciences, among other areas.
“The health care system has no shortage of data,” said MIT President L. Rafael Reif. “But it has far too little access to the kinds of tools and experts who can translate population-level data into clinical insights that could make it possible to tune care precisely for individuals. Building on MIT’s deep expertise in fields from cancer to neuroscience, and our longstanding connections to Boston’s world-class medical community, J-Clinic offers an accelerated path to creating new technologies that could help make health care more effective everywhere — from villages in developing nations to major teaching hospitals.”
“The J-Clinic will positively impact the world by accelerating the creation of machine learning technologies and algorithms that will make preventing, detecting, and treating disease more precise, affordable, and personalized,” said Anantha P. Chandrakasan, dean of the MIT School of Engineering, and Vannevar Bush, professor of electrical engineering and computer science, who will serve as J-Clinic’s chair. “It will be a truly multifaceted effort that amplifies synergies between the life sciences and the latest research in human and machine intelligence. J-Clinic will inspire innovation for the betterment of humanity.”
“Channeling MIT’s machine learning expertise into health care will transform medical outcomes for people around the world,” said Fady Jameel, president of Community Jameel International. “Health care has been an important sphere of activity for Community Jameel since our earliest days, from founding the first nonprofit hospital for physical rehabilitation in Saudi Arabia, to partnering with the King Salman Center for Disability Research. J-Clinic continues our journey of supporting cutting-edge research and driving innovation in health care, in Saudi Arabia and around the whole world.”