Chef Wolfgang Puck readies caviar, gold dust for Oscars feast

Master Chef Wolfgang Puck is pictured during a media preview of this year's Academy's Governors Ball in Los Angeles, California, U.S., March 1, 2018. (Reuters)
Updated 03 March 2018
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Chef Wolfgang Puck readies caviar, gold dust for Oscars feast

LOS ANGELES: Three-hundred pounds of Miyazaki Wagyu beef will be sliced, 1,500 quail eggs cracked and some 1,400 corks popped as Hollywood’s stars dine on chef Wolfgang Puck’s recipes after the Oscars are handed out on Sunday in Los Angeles.
Puck, the celebrity chef in his 24th year preparing the post-Academy Awards feast, on Thursday unveiled his menu for the annual Governor’s Ball that will serve up 30 pounds (13.6 kg) of edible gold dust to 1,500 guests of A-listers and Oscar winners.
“We are really all of us excited, and I really think for us it’s always very special,” the 68-year-old Austrian-born Puck said.
Diners will be treated to more than 50 dishes, including small-plate entrees such as mini pea and carrot ravioli with black truffle, a raw bar featuring caviar parfait with 24-karat gold, and cocktail-inspired macarons like negroni and mojito.
The event will require a staff of more than 1,000 to prepare food, serve 800 stone crab claws and pour more than 10,900 glasses of various beverages.
Puck, who also included vegan and gluten-free fare such as spinach campanelle and tiny taro tacos, approached the event with his trademark enthusiasm, cracking a raspberry dessert with a spoon while declaring sweets his “most important thing“
“As long as the Oscars is not tired of me, I’m not tired of Oscar,” Puck said with a grin.


What’s your status? Ten facts to mark the 30th World AIDS Day

A woman walks by the Pyramid of Cestius is illuminated in red for the World AIDS Day, in Rome, on Friday, Nov. 30 2018. (AP)
Updated 01 December 2018
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What’s your status? Ten facts to mark the 30th World AIDS Day

  • The first cases of AIDS are reported among gay men in Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York
  • The disease is found in several European countries, including Britain and France

LONDON: The global campaign to end AIDS has made significant strides but the epidemic remains one of the world’s leading public health challenges, affecting almost 37 million people.
Campaigners say one of the biggest challenges in the fight to end AIDS is encouraging people to get tested and making them aware of treatment and prevention services.
The theme of the 30th anniversary of World AIDS Day, which shows support for people living with HIV and commemorates those who have died, is “Know your Status.”
Here are 10 facts about HIV/AIDS.

- About 35 million people have died from AIDS- or HIV-related illnesses since 1981, including 940,000 in 2017.
- Increased awareness and access to antiretroviral drugs have more than halved the number of AIDS-related deaths since 2004.
- An estimated 77 million people have become infected with HIV since the start of the epidemic in 1981, including 1.8 million in 2017.
- Every week, almost 7,000 young women aged between 15 and 24 are infected with HIV.
- In sub-Saharan Africa young women are twice as likely to be living with HIV than men.
- South Africa has the world’s highest HIV prevalence, with almost one in five people infected.
- One in four people, about 9 million, are unaware that they are HIV-positive.
- UNAIDS wants nine in 10 people to know their status by 2020.
- Almost 22 million people were accessing antiretroviral drugs in 2017, compared with 8 million in 2010.
- Eight out of 10 pregnant women living with HIV received treatment in 2017, compared with less than half in 2010. Sources: UNAIDS, World Health Organization, Avert, HIV.gov