Bahrain arrests 116 alleged members of 'Iran-linked cell'

Bahrain’s Interior Ministry said on Saturday that a number of terrorist operations have been thwarted, and 116 Iran-backed terrorist elements have been arrested. (AFP)
Updated 03 March 2018
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Bahrain arrests 116 alleged members of 'Iran-linked cell'

DUBAI: Bahrain’s Interior Ministry said on Saturday that a number of terrorist operations have been thwarted, and 116 Iran-backed terrorist elements have been arrested.
“The roles of terrorist elements have varied in planning, preparation and execution between explosive carriers and field outlet, they were responsible for manufacturing, transporting and storing explosive materials,” the interior ministry said.
Leaders and employees of the security services, patrols and buses transporting security forces were targeted, as well as oil and vital facilities, all caused to disrupt security and order, hit the economy and endanger the country's security and safety, the ministry stated.
“Iran’s Revolutionary Guards worked to form these terrorist elements by uniting several terrorist organizations and collecting them in a single framework and are behind the support, funding and training of elements of terrorist organizations,” it continued.
“Iran's Revolutionary Guards have intensified recruitment of terrorist elements and provided them with funds, firearms and improvised explosive devices.”
48 out of 116 terrorists trained in IRGC camps in Iran and its foreign arms in Iraq and Lebanon.
(Developing)


Kosovan women returned from Syria face house arrest

Updated 24 April 2019
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Kosovan women returned from Syria face house arrest

  • Four alleged militants, all men, were arrested the moment they were brought to the country
  • The state prosecution said all 32 repatriated women are under investigation

PRISTINA: Kosovo prosecutors have requested the house arrest of 16 women repatriated from Syria, saying they are suspected of joining or taking part as foreign fighters there.

The women appeared on Wednesday in court in Pristina, a day after 10 other women were put under house arrest. None have been charged with a crime.

Four alleged militants, all men, were arrested the moment they were brought to the country.

The women and children were sent to the Foreign Detention Centre in the outskirts of Pristina but were freed to go home after 72 hours.

Ten women were seen entering Pristina Basic Court in a police escort on Tuesday. The court said in a statement later that they had been placed under house arrest on charges of joining foreign armed groups and terrorist groups in Syria and Iraq from 2014 to 2019.

The state prosecution said all 32 repatriated women are under investigation and more of them are expected to appear in front of judges on Wednesday. The prosecution has yet to file charges.

After the collapse of Islamic State’s self-declared caliphate in Syria and Iraq, countries around the world are wrestling with how to handle militants and their families seeking to return to their home countries.

Kosovo's population is nominally 90 percent Muslim, but the country is largely secular in outlook. More than 300 of its citizens travelled to Syria since 2012 and 70 men who fought alongside militant groups were killed.

Police said 30 Kosovan fighters, 49 women and eight children remain in the conflict zones. The government said it plans to bring back those who are still there.

International and local security agencies have previously warned of the risk posed by returning fighters. In 2015, Kosovo adopted a law making fighting in foreign conflicts punishable by up to 15 years in prison.

On Saturday, 110 Kosovar citizens — the four alleged foreign fighters, 32 women and 74 children — were returned to Kosovo with assistance from the United States, the first such move for a European country.

Authorities say there are still 87 Kosovar citizens in Syria.