Mali-based Al-Qaeda affiliate JNIM claims responsibility for Burkina Faso attacks

A Mali-based affiliate of Al-Qaeda has claimed responsibility for attacks in neighboring Burkina Faso's capital Ouagadougou. (AP)
Updated 03 March 2018
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Mali-based Al-Qaeda affiliate JNIM claims responsibility for Burkina Faso attacks

LONDON: A Mali-based affiliate of Al-Qaeda has claimed responsibility for attacks in neighboring Burkina Faso's capital Ouagadougou that killed eight people at the army headquarters and French embassy, according to the Mauritanian news agency Alakhbar.
The group, Jama’a Nusrat ul-Islam wa al-Muslimin (JNIM), often uses Alakhbar to claim responsibility for strikes against civilian and military targets across West Africa's Sahel region.
Alakhbar, citing a recording from the group, reported that the attacks were carried out in response to the killing of one of JNIM's leaders, Mohamed Hacen al-Ancari, in a recent raid by French forces.
The attackers killed eight people and wounded dozens more in a coordinated assault.


Report: US to send caskets to North Korea to return war remains

Updated 23 June 2018
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Report: US to send caskets to North Korea to return war remains

  • South Korean media say the US military plans to send 215 caskets to North Korea through a border village
  • North Korea agreed to send home US war remains during a June 12 meeting between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Donald Trump

SEOUL, South Korea: South Korean media say the US military plans to send 215 caskets to North Korea through a border village so that the North could begin the process of returning the remains of US soldiers who have been missing since the 1950-53 Korean War.
Officials from the United States Forces Korea and South Korea’s Defense Ministry on Saturday did not immediately return calls for comment.
South Korea’s Yonhap news agency cited an unnamed source as saying that about 30 US military vehicles carrying the caskets were expected to cross into the North on Saturday afternoon.
North Korea agreed to send home US war remains during a June 12 meeting between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Donald Trump.