Yemen: The international community must unite to stop export of Iranian weapons to the Houthis

Newly recruited Houthi militants take part in a gathering in the capital Sanaa to mobilize more militants to battlefronts to fight pro-government forces in several Yemeni cities. (AFP)
Updated 05 March 2018
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Yemen: The international community must unite to stop export of Iranian weapons to the Houthis

DUBAI: The Yemeni government reiterated its call for the international community to join forces to stop the continued export of Iranian weapons to Houthi militia, Saudi state-news channel Al-Ekhbariya reported.
The exports are a violation of UN Security Council resolutions and contribute to the continuation of the war and instability in the region, the government said.
Yemeni Foreign Minister Abdulmalik Al-Makhlafi said during his meeting with the US Ambassador to Yemen Matthew Tueller that the Iranian-backed Houthis have worked in every way to prevent reaching a sustainable peace in the country.
Al-Makhlafi reiterated the position of the legitimate government, which is committed to the peaceful solution based on the three reference points agreed upon locally, regionally and internationally.
He also renewed the support of the legitimate government for the new UN Secretary-General’s envoy, Martin Griffiths, expressed appreciation for the efforts of former envoy Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed.
He stressed the need to take advantage of the international community’s understanding of the situation in Yemen and build on the terms of the solution agreed upon to reach a sustainable peace that strengthens the government’s efforts to alleviate the suffering of Yemeni citizens at the hands of the militia.
For his part, Ambassador Tueller stressed the US’ support to the Yemeni government in the face of risks and challenges, pointing out the importance of continuous communication and coordination between the two sides and efforts to achieve peace in the country.


New social deal signed in Morocco, salaries to rise

Updated 3 min 58 sec ago
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New social deal signed in Morocco, salaries to rise

  • The minimum wage, currently 2,570 dirhams a month ($266), will be increased by 10 percent over two years from July
  • Last July King Mohammed VI urged the government to take “urgent action” to address social issues

RABAT: The Moroccan government on Thursday announced a “new social deal” with employers and the main labor unions, under which many workers will enjoy a pay rise.
The deal agreed by the General Confederation of Moroccan Businesses (CGEM) and the three main unions — the UMT, UGTM and UNMT — is the fruit of months of negotiations
The minimum wage, currently 2,570 dirhams a month ($266), will be increased by 10 percent over two years from July, except for the agricultural sector.
Government-paid family allowances will also rise.
Meanwhile public sector workers will be given a 300-500 dirham monthly pay increase over three years.
Of Morocco’s main trade unions only the Democratic Labour Confederation has not signed the social deal which, according to the government statement, is aimed at “improving spending power and the social climate.”
Last July King Mohammed VI urged the government to take “urgent action” to address social issues, in particular health and education in the north African country which has been hit by protests over employment and corruption.
Mohammed VI pointed to social support and social protection programs that “overlap each other, suffer from a lack of consistency and fail to effectively target eligible groups.”
After months of stalemate, the dossier was handed to the interior ministry at the beginning of the year and the final rounds of talks were held.
The social unrest began in October 2016 after the death of a fisherman and spiralled into a wave of protests demanding more development in the neglected Rif region and railing against corruption and unemployment.
Morocco is marked by glaring social and territorial inequalities, against a backdrop of high unemployment among young people. In 2018, it was ranked 123rd out of 189 countries and territories on the Human Development Index.