P&G cuts digital ad spend by $200m over viewership worries

Procter & Gamble, the world’s biggest advertiser, last week revealed it had cut digital advertising spend by $200 million because of concerns about viewership data.
Updated 06 March 2018
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P&G cuts digital ad spend by $200m over viewership worries

LONDON: Procter & Gamble, the world’s biggest advertiser, last week revealed it had cut digital advertising spend by $200 million because of concerns about viewership data.
It has piled pressure on digital media companies to be more transparent with their viewership data to better understand how many people see their ads.
“Transparency shone a spotlight on reality and we learned valuable lessons which are driving profound change,” Marc Pritchard, P&G’s chief brand officer said at the Association of National Advertisers’ media conference in Orlando, Florida last week, Reuters reported.
“With transparent viewability data, we learned that the average view time for an ad on a mobile newsfeed is 1.7 seconds — little more than a glance — pushing us to innovate.”
Pritchard revealed that new advertising consumption data had convinced it to reduce digital spending to several big media companies by 20 percent to 50 percent last year.
The consumer goods conglomerate cut digital spending by more $100 million between April and June of 2017.


Netflix’s top spokesman fired over use of racial term

Updated 23 June 2018
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Netflix’s top spokesman fired over use of racial term

  • Netflix CEO Reed Hastings says he fired the company’s top spokesman over use of the N-word
  • In a memo to employees, published by Variety and The Hollywood Reporter and confirmed by Netflix, Hastings says Friedland used the word twice

SAN FRANCISCO: Netflix CEO Reed Hastings says he fired the company’s top spokesman over use of the N-word.
The spokesman, Jonathan Friedland, confirmed in tweets that he was leaving the company, saying he was insensitive in speaking with his team about words that offend in comedy.
In a memo to employees, published by Variety and The Hollywood Reporter and confirmed by Netflix, Hastings says Friedland used the word twice — first in a meeting of public relations staff several months ago about sensitive words. Hastings wrote that several people told Friedland how inappropriate and hurtful his use of the word was.
Hastings says Friedland, who is white, later repeated the word with human resources staff trying to address the original incident. Hastings wrote the second incident “confirmed a deep lack of understanding.”