Saudi Cabinet slams violations in Syria’s Eastern Ghouta

King Salman presides over a cabinet meeting in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (REUTERS)
Updated 07 March 2018
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Saudi Cabinet slams violations in Syria’s Eastern Ghouta

RIYADH: The Saudi Cabinet on Tuesday condemned ongoing human rights violations in Eastern Ghouta by the Syrian regime and allied militias, including indiscriminate bombing, the use of chemical weapons and the prevention of humanitarian access.
The Cabinet meeting, chaired by King Salman at Al-Yamamah Palace, also demanded that all parties immediately adhere to UN Security Council Resolution 2401 to allow the delivery of humanitarian assistance and medical evacuations.
The Cabinet paid tribute to Bahrain’s efforts to combat terrorism, including foiling a number of terrorist acts and arresting 116 people affiliated to a terrorist organization formed by Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC).
The Cabinet condemned a series of militant attacks in the capital of Burkina Faso, Ouagadougou, offering condolences to the victims, the government and the country’s people.
The Cabinet reviewed the latest regional and global developments, and Saudi participation in the 37th session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva.
The Kingdom promotes and protects human rights regardless of race, color or gender, and cooperates with international human rights mechanisms, the Cabinet said.
It was briefed on the results of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s visit to Egypt, and his talks with President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi, during which agreements and a memorandum of understanding were signed to deepen strategic bilateral relations in various fields.


Called to the barre: Saudi ballet gets its groove on

Ballet’s popularity is growing among different age groups. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)
Updated 18 min 13 sec ago
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Called to the barre: Saudi ballet gets its groove on

  • Widad Al-Kibsi, a Saudi ballet instructor at the studio, said that people in Jeddah were now familiar with ballet
  • A 13-year-old student at the studio, Oroub Al-Shareef, said that she began ballet when she was 4 years old

JEDDAH: Ballet, one of the world’s most demanding art forms, is enjoying soaring popularity in Saudi Arabia as a new generation discovers its physical, mental and social benefits, and a Jeddah-based studio is at the forefront of the dance’s development in the Kingdom.
Sera McKnass, founder of iBallerina, said that the studio is shaping future ballerinas to be effective members of society.
“The goal is not only to pass on the art of ballet but also to raise up participants into healthy, classy and confident, caring individuals,” the 30-year-old Turkish-Lebanese master teacher said.
Ballet’s popularity is growing among different age groups.
“Mothers sign up their daughters to be trained as ballerinas, but now young adults have dreams of learning how to pirouette, chasse and jete,” McKnass told Arab News. “They come to iBallerina to start the journey and transform their souls and bodies, becoming stronger and more graceful women.”
Widad Al-Kibsi, a Saudi ballet instructor at the studio, said that people in Jeddah were now familiar with ballet. “It's now in most of the main gyms, and private or international schools in the city.”
The 20-year-old advises aspiring ballerinas to start at a young age. “It’s important to start early because improved strength and flexibility are easily acquired at a younger age.”
Ballet offers myriad physical benefits, she said. “It improves muscle tone and definition, elongates arms, and aligns the posture properly.”
Al-Kibsi said that while many Saudis saw ballet as an activity for children, “not a lot of them are aware that adults can also perform. They assume that you should be thin or flexible from the get-go. They don’t understand that with dedication and discipline, ballet strengthens and increases flexibility.”
Dana Garii, a 23-year-old Saudi writer, has been practicing ballet at the studio since February.
“I’ve been wanting to do it since I was young, but I couldn’t find the opportunity. When I found they have classes here, I just went for it. People asked me, ‘aren’t you too old?’ But that’s a myth. People think you can’t do ballet after a certain age, but you can start any time,” she told Arab News.
“Ballet is important to me. It’s more than just the physical aspects — it has taught me how to be modest, and that nothing hard ever comes easy.
“It has also taught me patience and how to take on difficult situations because it’s not only difficult physically but also psychologically. It has taught me how to overcome my fears,” Garii said.
A 13-year-old student at the studio, Oroub Al-Shareef, said that she began ballet when she was 4 years old.
“There was a TV show for kids about the mouse that did ballet (‘Angelina Ballerina’) and it inspired me. I’ve always wanted to be a ballerina,” she said.
“Ballet is very important to me. Dance is one of the ways I express myself and I feel at one with myself when I’m practicing.
“It’s a very hard thing to do, but it brings me so much joy.”
Saudi graphic designer Sara Al-Sabaan, 22, has also been practicing ballet since she was a young child.
“I started dancing in a ballet school in Guadalajara, in Mexico. Then I continued at the Kinetico dance school in Riyadh,” she said.
Al-Sabaan’s mother inspired her to take up the art form. “I’m following in her footsteps. She was a ballet dancer herself.”
The young dancer has watched ballet’s growth in popularity. “Dance classes were available when I was a child, but they have been most popular in the past decade.”
Practicing ballet is a form of self-expression, she said.
“I have danced modern, contemporary and classical ballet, and it affects me immensely. Not only is it a great physical activity, it’s also an outlet for self-expression through movement.”