Music fans mourn end of British magazine NME’s print edition

British music magazine NME will stop publishing its weekly print edition. (Screenshot)
Updated 07 March 2018
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Music fans mourn end of British magazine NME’s print edition

LONDON: British music magazine NME, which helped mold musical tastes for several generations, will stop publishing its weekly print edition.
Publisher Time Inc. UK said Tuesday that it will be “focusing investment on further expanding NME’s digital audience.” The final weekly edition will appear Friday.
Founded in 1952 as New Musical Express, the magazine became essential reading for fans and a coveted platform for musicians through the eras of Beatlemania, prog-rock, punk, indie and more.
News of its print demise triggered a wave of nostalgia from fans and bands with many tweeting images of their favorite covers and the hashtag #RIPNME.
Singer-songwriter Billy Bragg tweeted: “When I first started out, my ambitions were to make an album, tour America and be on the cover of the New Musical Express.”


Turkey remains world’s worst offender against press freedom

Updated 48 min 5 sec ago
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Turkey remains world’s worst offender against press freedom

  • A report by the Committee to Protect Journalists said that a near-record number of journalists around the world are behind bars for their work
  • The CPJ said there are dozens of reporters missing or kidnapped in the Middle East and North Africa

Turkey remains the world’s worst offender against press freedom, the Committee to Protect Journalists said on Thursday, with at least 68 journalists imprisoned for anti-state charges.

Turkey has previously said its crackdown is justified because of an attempted coup to overthrow the government in 2016.

The report said that a near-record number of journalists around the world are behind bars for their work, including two Reuters reporters whose imprisonment in Myanmar has drawn international criticism.

There were 251 journalists jailed for doing their jobs as of Dec. 1, the CPJ said in an annual study. For the third consecutive year, more than half are in Turkey, China and Egypt, where authorities have accused reporters of anti-governmental activities.

“It looks like a trend now,” the report’s author, Elana Beiser, said in an interview. “It looks like the new normal.”

The number of journalists imprisoned on charges of “false news” rose to 28, up from 21 last year and nine in 2016, according to the CPJ, a U.S.-based nonprofit that promotes press freedom.

The report criticized U.S. President Donald Trump for frequently characterizing negative media coverage as “fake news,” a phrase that is also used by leaders against their critics in countries like the Philippines and Turkey.

In Egypt, at least 25 journalists are in prison. Authorities say this is to limit dissent are directed at militants trying to undermine the state.

Meanwhile, when asked about journalists being jailed, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang said: “Legal measures are not taken because of these suspects’ or criminals’ professions. This is unrelated.”

The overall number of jailed journalists is down eight percent from last year’s record high of 272, the CPJ said.

The total does not take into account journalists who have disappeared or are being held by non-state actors. The CPJ said there are dozens of reporters missing or kidnapped in the Middle East and North Africa, including several held by Houthis in Yemen.

(With Reuters)