Sky is the limit for Jordanian mountaineer who is helping Arab women reach new heights

Dolores El-Shelleh: ‘As an Arab woman I always wanted to do something challenging.’
Updated 08 March 2018
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Sky is the limit for Jordanian mountaineer who is helping Arab women reach new heights

DUBAI: When most people take on a challenge, they usually start small before moving on to tougher and more demanding feats.
But from the start, Dolores El-Shelleh set her sights as high as possible, literally, by deciding to climb the world’s tallest mountain, Everest.
“As an Arab woman I always wanted to do something challenging and new from my perspective that will distinguish me among my community,” said the 27-year-old Jordanian. “Then I found my ambition. Mountaineering is a new trend in Arab culture. Not many women get the chance to do this activity and a lot of people are amazed that I come from the Middle East and I am in my 20s.
“I really wanted to step in and try something totally different, something out of my comfort zone and my family’s and community’s beliefs.”
However, not everyone was supportive of her passion as she set out to achieve her dream.
“I faced two different-sided opinions in my family: Those who encouraged and those who were against it, especially at the beginning,” said El-Shelleh. “Relatives have approached my father saying, ‘What are you doing, letting your daughter go to the Himalayas — it’s dangerous.’”
Women from traditionally conservative countries in the Arab world often feel pressure to conform to the cultural norms of their families and societies, such as marrying young or keeping their personal or career aspirations in fields deemed more “suitable for women.”
El-Shelleh is determined to break the mold and hopes to inspire others to follow suit.
“I want to be an inspiration and have the honor of raising the flags of both my beloved home country Jordan and the country of opportunities, the UAE, on the world’s highest mountain,” she said. “I want to make every person in my country proud, and empower other women in my society to have the courage to speak with loud voices and overcome the fear of resistance, no matter what their ambitions in life.”
El-Shelleh has already scaled smaller peaks in the Himalayas, and Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, one of the so-called seven summits, the highest mountains on each continent. She has also completed a technical winter mountaineering course in the Alps.
Her dream of conquering Everest has attracted support from, and helped to inspire, women in her native Jordan and across the region.
“A lot of women come back to me and say, ‘Dolores, we never thought we would do something that challenging and now we want to go full force and try it’,” said El-Shelleh.
She also revealed that her dream is about much more than just the climb.
“It is not only about reaching the mountain’s summit,” she said. “It is the adventure itself and learning about the different cultures in this world, which will bring us closer to humanity.”
As she continues her training to prepare for Everest, the next summit she will tackle is Elbrus, the highest mountain in Europe. She will climb it with a team as part of an initiative for Jordan’s King Hussein Cancer Foundation, titled “From the Lowest point to the Highest point against Cancer.”
El-Shelleh’s Everest climb is scheduled for 2019, which means her training schedule is rigorous and involves some personal hardship.
“It takes compromise and sacrifice,” she said. “People don’t see the frustration in it — finding true believers to be part of this journey is time-consuming and a lot of people won’t understand that.”
El-Shelleh fits her strict training regime and schedule around her full-time job in advertising.
“I felt like I was going to quit a couple of times — and I still feel a lot of frustration — but I just keep remembering that I’ve come so far on this path and I also have a lot of supporters who are true leaders so why should I stop now?” she said. “I keep thinking why should I stop now if I truly believe that nothing is impossible?”
Perseverance is key to her successes so far and is, she believes, “something everyone should have to conquer any type of goal in life.”


Farah the Falcon swoops in to predict World Cup results, but will Saudi Arabia win?

Updated 20 June 2018
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Farah the Falcon swoops in to predict World Cup results, but will Saudi Arabia win?

  • More than half her predictions have been accurate, although she was wrong about Egypt
  • Now see her make her swoop for the next Saudi Arabian match

DUBAI: South Africa’s World Cup had Paul the Octopus in 2010, Brazil’s World Cup had Big Head the loggerhead turtle in 2014, now Russia’s World Cup has Farah the Falcon.

However, the feathered flyer predicted Egypt to come out triumphant in Tuesday night’s game against host’s Russia - but the outcome was the opposite.

Farah guessed Saudi Arabia would lose its second game at the tournament against Uruguay on Wednesday.

This is not what any Saudi Arabia fan wants to see (Screenshot/Youtube: Dubai Eye 103.8 Sport)

It has been a rough group stage for Arab nations with all four countries losing their games so far.

Swooping in from her perch on the arm of her trainer, Farah – who is sponsored by UAE-based radio station Dubai Eye – glides towards one of two wooden flags bearing the colors of the countries playing against each other.

The flag she lands on is her predicted winner for the game.

So far, 10 of the 17 games played have been predicted correctly – with two of those ending in draws and seven ending with the predicted winner actually losing. This makes her accuracy at 58.8 percent.

Tunisia is predicted to lose its games on Saturday against Belgium, with Morocco set to suffer the same fate against Portugal on Wednesday according to the feathered foreseer.

Paul the Octopus was the most famous of the animal predictors, predicting 12 out of 14 matches correctly with an accuracy of 85.7 percent.

See how Farah made her Saudi Arabia v Uruguay prediction