Israel’s cellphone coverage disrupted by fighting in Sinai

A general view shows Israel's border fence with Egypt's Sinai peninsula (R), as seen from Israel's Negev Desert on February 10, 2016. (REUTERS/Amir Cohen/File Photo)
Updated 08 March 2018
0

Israel’s cellphone coverage disrupted by fighting in Sinai

JERUSALEM: An Israeli minister has hinted that a disruption to cellphone coverage across southern Israel was caused by fighting in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula.
Communications Minister Ayoob Kara told Army Radio on Wednesday that defense and military officials held a “very important meeting” with their counterparts “over the border” to resolve the “crisis” and that cellular reception will soon be restored after a more than weeklong disruption. Army Radio identified the foreign officials as Egyptian.
Egypt’s military did not immediately comment.
Cairo launched a major sweep of Sinai militants loyal to Daesh on Feb. 9. Israeli officials said that on Feb. 21 Egyptian forces began jamming a range of cellphone frequencies in Sinai, disrupting reception in Israel and Gaza.
“We’ve never seen anything this intensive or protracted. Even the Palestinians have been coming to us, appealing to make it stop,” one Israeli official told Reuters on condition of anonymity. Phones had been disrupted as far away as Jerusalem and northern Israel, depending on weather, the official said.
An Egyptian official who also asked not to be identified confirmed electronic warfare was being waged in the Sinai. “Obviously, we want to stop terrorists from communicating,” he told Reuters.
The official denied that Israel was the intended target of the jamming, but he said some Sinai insurgents were suspected of using smuggled Israeli SIM cards, close enough to the border to link up with Israeli cellphone reception, “which means that we may need to work against a wide range of frequencies.”
Several Palestinian residents of Gaza, the densely populated enclave on the Egyptian border, told Reuters they had been experiencing problems with phone service.

A source at one of the two Palestinian mobile phone companies said its services were disrupted for a day in the past week in southern Gaza but that the problem had been resolved.
Israeli cellphone provider Partner said several hundred of its customers had complained about reception problems, but that its 4G network was working well. Other leading Israeli providers, Cellcom and Pelephone, did not immediately respond to requests for comment.
Gadi Yarkoni, a mayor representing Israeli communities near Gaza, criticised the Communications Ministry and threatened to sue the phone companies, saying the failure to fix disruptions “shows disrespect for the residents of the Gaza periphery.”
The Multinational Force and Observers (MFO), an international body set up under the Israel-Egypt peace agreement to monitor the Sinai, declined to comment.


Human rights monitor accuses Yemen rebels of hostage-taking, torture

Updated 59 min 50 sec ago
0

Human rights monitor accuses Yemen rebels of hostage-taking, torture

  • ‘Houthi officials have treated detainees brutally, often amounting to torture’
  • ‘Some Houthi officials are exploiting their power to turn a profit through detention, torture and murder’

DUBAI: Human Rights Watch on Tuesday accused Yemen’s Houthi rebels of hostage-taking, torture and other serious abuses against people in their custody.
The New York-based watchdog said it had documented 16 cases of illegal imprisonment by the Iran-backed Shiite insurgents, “in large part to extort money from relatives or to exchange them for people held by opposing forces.”
“Houthi officials have treated detainees brutally, often amounting to torture,” HRW said, adding that former detainees described being beaten with iron rods, wooden sticks and assault rifles.
Prisoners were shackled to walls, caned and threatened with rape, it said, noting that hostage-taking “is a serious violation of the laws of war and a war crime.”
“The Houthis have added profiteering to their long list of abuses and offenses against the people under their control in Yemen,” said HRW Middle East director Sarah Leah Whitson.
“Rather than treat detainees humanely, some Houthi officials are exploiting their power to turn a profit through detention, torture and murder.”
The Houthis seized the capital Sanaa in 2014, forcing the government of President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi to flee south.
HRW called on the UN Human Rights Council to renew the mandate of a group of experts on Yemen to investigate and identify all parties responsible for abuses.