Rebel Wilson seeks legal fees after record Australia payout

The Australian court earlier heard that Rebel Wilson had offered to settle the case for A$200,000 before it went to trial, with most of her legal costs coming from solicitor’s fees preparing her case. (AFP)
Updated 08 March 2018
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Rebel Wilson seeks legal fees after record Australia payout

MELBOURNE: Hollywood actress Rebel Wilson spent more than A$1.3 million ($1.1 million) to win Australia’s largest defamation payout, it was revealed Thursday, and she is now chasing publisher Bauer to pay those costs as well.
The “Pitch Perfect” star was awarded A$4.5 million in damages against the group last September over articles claiming she lied about her age and background to further her career.
The allegations were made in Woman’s Day, Australian Women’s Weekly and OK Magazine in 2015, which Wilson said damaged her reputation. She won the case and vowed to give the payout to charity.
Bauer are appealing and have been backed by some of the country’s leading media organizations who argue the size of the settlement set a dangerous precedent.
A day after she tweeted “Girls just wanna have funds,” Wilson’s lawyers appeared in the Victorian Supreme Court in a battle over the fees.
It heard that experts engaged by lawyers for both Wilson and Bauer had estimated the actress would be entitled to recover between A$1.1 million and A$1.3 million, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation reported.
Wilson’s barrister Renee Enbom said it effectively meant they were quibbling over A$200,000.
“It’s $200,000, that’s what we’re fighting about,” she said, according to the broadcaster, in urging the judge to make an order on costs rather than it going to a dedicated costs court, which would potentially delay the payment.
Justice John Dixon reserved his decision.
The court earlier heard that Wilson had offered to settle the case for A$200,000 before it went to trial, with most of her legal costs coming from solicitor’s fees preparing her case.


Boris Becker denies claims diplomatic passport is ‘fake’

Former German tennis player Boris Becker. (AFP)
Updated 23 June 2018
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Boris Becker denies claims diplomatic passport is ‘fake’

  • Lawyers for the three-time Wimbledon champion lodged a claim in the High Court in Britain saying that he had been appointed a sports attache for the CAR to the European Union (EU) in April
  • Becker shook up the tennis world at Wimbledon in 1985 when, as an unseeded player, he became the then youngest-ever male Grand Slam champion at the age of 17

LONDON: Tennis legend Boris Becker on Friday insisted that his Central African Republic diplomatic passport, which he claims entitles him to immunity in bankruptcy proceedings, was real despite the country’s leaders calling it a “fake.”
“I have received this passport from the ambassador, I have spoken to the president on many occasions, it was an official inauguration,” the German star told BBC’s Andrew Marr.
“I believe the documents they are giving me must be right.”
Lawyers for the three-time Wimbledon champion lodged a claim in the High Court in Britain saying that he had been appointed a sports attache for the CAR to the European Union (EU) in April.
This, they argued, granted him immunity under the 1961 Vienna Diplomatic Convention on Diplomatic Relations from bankruptcy proceedings over failure to pay a long-standing debt in Britain.
Bur CAR leaders say the document’s serial number corresponded to one of a batch of “new passports that were stolen in 2014.”
In April, the 50-year-old former tennis star tweeted a picture of himself shaking hands with CAR President Faustin-Archange Touadera at a meeting in Brussels.
Becker told Marr he was “very happy anytime soon to visit Bangui, the capital and to speak to the people, personally about how we can move forward and how can we resolve this misunderstanding.”
Becker shook up the tennis world at Wimbledon in 1985 when, as an unseeded player, he became the then youngest-ever male Grand Slam champion at the age of 17, defending the trophy the following year.
He went on to enjoy a glittering career and amassed more than $25 million (21.65 million euros) in prize money.