Kingdom aims to quadruple mining, renewables and logistics says Al-Falih

Saudi Arabia' oil minister Khalid Al-Falih and foreign minister Adel Al-Jubeir on their way to meet Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May in Downing Street. (Reuters)
Updated 08 March 2018
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Kingdom aims to quadruple mining, renewables and logistics says Al-Falih

LONDON: Saudi Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih has revealed the Kingdom aims to quadruple the size of its mining, renewables and logistics sectors.
He was speaking at the Saudi-UK CEO Forum in London to mark the state visit of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to London.
“One of our programs is the development of the Kingdom’s industrial energy and logistics. These are right at the heart of creating investment opportunities. We have $1.3 trillion of mining endowment. We want to quadruple our mining statistics and supply chains. As we quadruple some of these sectors, the focus is on quality not quantity. This will require the best collaboration between us,” Al-Falih said.
“The chemicals sector, which has grown fantastically in the last few decades, now needs to grow in terms of technology content and value added projects.”
Earlier, Liam Fox, the UK trade secretary said Britain was committed to helping Saudi Arabia become a “global investment powerhouse.”
Fox said he hoped Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund (PIF) would find Britain a key investment opportunity that could work for both countries, and that would boost London’s status as a world financial center.
Fox also said the first Saudi/UK education dialogue will take place, to “establish a government to government policy exchange.”
Peter Mandelson, former EU trade minister, said the key to understanding KSA investment opportunities for Britain was the realization that Saudi Arabia was a staging post between and East and West, and “a jumping off point to Africa,” said Mandelson, former minister in Tony Blair’s Labour government.


Former Irish bank chief jailed over crisis-era fraud

Updated 20 June 2018
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Former Irish bank chief jailed over crisis-era fraud

  • Judge Karen O’Connor stressed that Drumm was not being jailed for “the financial crisis,” instead “only for the two specific offenses for which he has been convicted.”
  • Anglo Irish Bank required a huge state bailout and was nationalized in 2009, contributing to an economic crisis in Ireland that later forced Dublin to seek an €85-billion-international rescue.

Dublin: A judge on Wednesday jailed a former head of Anglo Irish Bank for six years for carrying out fraud at the start of the world financial crisis a decade ago.
David Drumm, 51, had at an earlier hearing been found guilty of fraud and false accounting at the bank, whose rapid fall from grace epitomised Ireland’s own financial collapse.
Ahead of sentencing, the court on Wednesday heard from the defense that Drumm had acknowledged a “huge error in judgment” over the €7.2 billion fraud.
Judge Karen O’Connor, sitting at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court, stressed that Drumm was not being jailed for “the financial crisis,” instead “only for the two specific offenses for which he has been convicted.”
Drumm had been accused of transferring huge sums between Anglo Irish Bank and another financial institution, sometimes only for a few hours, to make the bank’s balance sheet look better than it was as the global financial crisis took hold.
Anglo Irish Bank required a huge state bailout and was nationalized in 2009, contributing to an economic crisis in Ireland that later forced Dublin to seek an €85-billion-international rescue.
Drumm moved to Boston in the United States shortly after the collapse of Anglo Irish Bank, but was later arrested there and extradited to Ireland to face trial.
Two of Drumm’s Anglo colleagues and the former head of Irish Life and Permanent — the other financial institution involved in the fraud — had already been jailed over the same conspiracy.
Passing sentence on Drumm, O’Connor took into account the five months he had already served in the US custody awaiting his return to Ireland.