Aramco chief says all work needed for IPO to be done by second half of 2018

Saudi Aramco CEO Nasser Amin said that “all the work-streams” needed for the oil giant’s public listing would be completed by the second half of 2018. (Reuters)
Updated 04 April 2018
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Aramco chief says all work needed for IPO to be done by second half of 2018

  • New maritime industries complex and King Salman Energy City to be fully operational in 2022
  • 2 "Giga" projects would create 180,000 jobs in KSA and contribute $16 billion to national GDP
LONDON: Saudi Aramco CEO Amin Nasser said that “all the work-streams” needed for the oil giant’s public listing would be completed by the second half of 2018.
But the Aramco boss did not reveal any clues about the likely location for the listing.
“On the question of where we will be listed, I will park that,” he said.

The London Stock Exchange, as well as exchanges in New York and Hong Kong are competing to be the international location for the initial public offering that could raise about $100 billion and value the state-owned oil from at as much as $2 trillion.
Nasser told the London forum that Aramco viewed gas as a “significant” growth area, and he was trying to capture growth in different parts of the world, both upstream and downstream.
There has been speculation Aramco might do gas deals with Russia and even buy shale assets in the US.
During a panel discussion about KSA “giga-projects,” Nasser flagged up major projects in KSA where the oil company was active in promoting development and growth.
For example, he talked about a new maritime industries complex in the Kingdom that is a joint project with global companies such as Hyundai Heavy Industries.
“When fully operational in 2022, this integrated maritime yard will be one of the largest full-service maritime facilities,” he said.
He also mentioned King Salman Energy City.
“The industrial manufacturing center will be developed over 500,000 square meters on land allocated for energy-related industries,” he said.
The first phase is expected to be completed in the second quarter of 2018.
Last year, US-based drilling and oil service firm Schlumberger said it would develop a manufacturing facility within the park.
Nasser said the new development would bring major manufacturing capacity to the Kingdom, with the potential to develop export markets.
He added the idea was “to bring the jobs and investment that are crucial to both Saudi Aramco’s IKTVA (In-Kingdom Total Value Add) development program, and the Kingdom’s Vision 2030.”
He estimated that the two giga projets would create 180,000 jobs in KSA and contribute $16 billion to national GDP.


OPEC oil ministers gather to discuss production increase

Updated 19 June 2018
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OPEC oil ministers gather to discuss production increase

  • Analysts expect the group to discuss an increase in production of about 1 million barrels a day
  • The officials were arriving in Vienna ahead of the official meeting Friday

VIENNA: The oil ministers of the OPEC cartel were gathering Tuesday to discuss this week whether to increase production of crude and help limit a rise in global energy prices.
The officials were arriving in Vienna ahead of the official meeting Friday, when they will also confer with Russia, a non-OPEC country that since late 2016 has cooperated with the cartel to limit production.
Analysts expect the group to discuss an increase in production of about 1 million barrels a day, ending the output cut agreed on in 2016.
The cut has since then pushed up the price of crude oil by about 50 percent. The US benchmark in May hit its highest level in three and half years, at $72.35 a barrel.
Upon arriving, the energy minister of the United Arab Emirates, Suhail Al Mazrouei, said: “It’s going to be hopefully a good meeting. We look forward to having this gathering with OPEC and non-OPEC.”
The 14 countries in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries make more money with higher prices, but are mindful of the fact that more expensive crude can encourage a shift to renewable resources and hurt demand.
“Consumers as well as businesses will be hoping that this week’s OPEC meeting succeeds in keeping a lid on prices, and in so doing calling a halt to a period which has seen a steady rise in fuel costs,” said Michael Hewson, chief market analyst at CMC Markets UK
The rise in the cost of oil has been a key factor in driving up consumer price inflation in major economies like the US and Europe in recent months.
Already US President Donald Trump has called on OPEC to cut production, tweeting in April and again this month that “OPEC is at it again” by allowing oil prices to rise.
Within OPEC, an increase in output will not affect all countries equally. While Saudi Arabia, the cartel’s biggest producer, is seen to be open to a rise in production, other countries cannot afford to do so. Those include Iran and Venezuela, whose industries are stymied either by international sanctions or domestic turmoil. Iran is a fierce regional rival to Saudi Arabia, meaning the OPEC deal could also influence the geopolitics in the Middle East.