Saudi medical scientist Nouf Al-Numair hopes success will be contagious after clinching British Council award

Nouf Al-Numair, second from left, received the British Council Alumni Award for Social Impact during a ceremony in Riyadh recently. (AN photo by Iqbal Hossain)
Updated 09 March 2018
0

Saudi medical scientist Nouf Al-Numair hopes success will be contagious after clinching British Council award

JEDDAH: It is not unusual for young girls to watch their mothers prepare meals, but one girl in Riyadh liked to pretend the kitchen was her laboratory, and the ingredients were the chemicals that intrigued her. For Saudi scientist Nouf Al-Numair that was the start of a fascination that led her to the study of bioinformatics and molecular genetics.
Now she is investigating the future of diseases before they even come into existence through genetic mutation; her job involves predicting diseases’ reactions to personalized medicine and treatment. Besides the biology and genetic knowledge, she uses more than seven programming languages to analyze human genes.
A scientist at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center in Riyadh, Al-Numair is also an assistant professor at Alfaisal University’s College of Medicine and a visiting researcher at the Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology.
She was recently awarded the British Council Alumni Award for Social Impact. She spoke to Arab News about her accomplishments and how she hopes to use the recognition to help create a positive image of Saudi women. She also spoke of the importance of overseas study in the accomplishment of her goals.
“I discovered my passion for genetics early on and was determined to study the subject more deeply and from the perspective of merging the science of molecular genetics and computer programming,” Al-Numair said.
“There were no such courses available in Saudi Arabia at that time, and I was told by many people that it was too difficult to merge the two sciences and so they discouraged me. I took the chance, however, and decided to follow my passion and make my dreams come true. Back in 2008 and 2009, this particular field of study was not available in Saudi Arabia, so I had to go to the UK for specialized courses. Even in the UK my field was not common and there was a lot of experimental work, but I stuck to it and was determined to succeed and be the first Saudi with these qualifications. My coursework was often personalized and if I had not been able to do my degrees and training in the UK, I would never have achieved my aim.”
Living in London presented challenges, but those challenges helped her to gain a broader understanding of various perspectives — invaluable for a scientist.
“In my group we had more than seven nationalities. I learnt how to open my eyes and my mind to listen to other people’s thoughts and opinions,” Al-Numair said. “I have always believed that socially and scientifically you must be able to look at other people’s views and their ways of thinking. Of course, different cultures, different background, and different educations all had a great impact on me. I was stepping out of my comfort zone, but I learnt how to do it, and this gave me confidence and the ability to explain myself. I was a kind of ‘opposite’ but not in a bad way, but opposite in a different way. Understanding that and coming to terms with it was a great step forward for me.”
The British Council award is of particular significance to Al-Numair, and she hopes that her story will inspire other young Saudis to consider scientific careers.
“They did not give me the award because I am a Saudi who worked in a certain field. People in Britain realize that I can have some impact in Saudi Arabia, and I think that the impact on the younger generation will be great and that they will see new possibilities for themselves,” Al-Numair said.
“I really want to encourage the younger generation to involve themselves in science. I really want to help in the empowerment of women and show them that they can have both family and a career. We can be scientists; we are bright, smart and can engage ourselves in the community and in our work. From that, we will get confidence and determination to succeed as well as to live and enjoy our lives.”
While Al-Numair investigates future diseases and tries to keep them in check, she hopes her success will be contagious.
“I want to encourage girls who studied in Saudi Arabia, attended Saudi schools, graduated from Saudi universities, to have the same chances I had,” she said. “They can succeed, and they can get what they want because they see me in front of them as an example. I sincerely want to have an impact on them.”


Enigmatic traveler who revealed full majesty of Makkah to the world

Pilgrims camp in Arafat during Hajj in this rare old picture. (Supplied)
Updated 3 min 52 sec ago
0

Enigmatic traveler who revealed full majesty of Makkah to the world

  • The next day he and his companions wore Ihram garments and walked along winding roads until they reached Makkah
  • The vessel floundered and sank, forcing Al-Abbasi and his men to flee in a lifeboat and row for hours before reaching the safety of a Red Sea island

JEDDAH: Ali Bey Al-Abbasi was not the first European enamored with the Arab Peninsula and the mysteries of Makkah. Nor was he the first Westerner to visit the city — but he was an unusually resourceful man, with wealth of unknown origin and a great thirst for discovery, who provided Westerners with the first comprehensive account of the city.
He was born Domingo Francisco Jorge Badía y Leblich in Barcelona in 1767. After receiving a liberal education, he focused on astronomy, medicine and mineral science. He also developed an interest in learning Arabic.
“Al-Abbasi was an agent of the king of Spain or of Napoleon,” says August Raleigh, author of the book “Makkah in the Eyes of a Christian Pilgrim.”
In 1801, Al-Abbasi set off for Paris and London, returning to Spain two years later wearing Islamic clothing. Later, he formed a close friendship with the sultan of Morocco who, with growing affection, advised the Spaniard to find a wife, to which Al-Abbasi replied that he had made a pledge not to marry before visiting Makkah. The sultan tried to discourage Al-Abbasi from making the trip but when he could not, and saw the determination of his friend, he presented him with a beautiful, extravagant tent as a gift.
On the third day of Shawwal, 1806, Al-Abbasi joined a convoy heading to Makkah, taking with him 14 camels and two horses. He boarded a ship from Suez but fate, and the weather, were not on his side. The vessel floundered and sank, forcing Al-Abbasi and his men to flee in a lifeboat and row for hours before reaching the safety of a Red Sea island. From there, they were rescued and taken to Jeddah.
On the 12th day of Dul Qaada, Al-Abbasi had to be carried on a stretcher because he had a fever that weakened him and damaged his bones. The next day he and his companions wore Ihram garments and walked along winding roads until they reached Makkah.
Al-Abbasi entered the city and when he reached the courtyard of the mosque, a guide gestured for him to stop. He pointed to the Kaaba and said: “Look. Look at the house of God.”
The Spaniard was deeply affected by the reverence of his experience. He wrote: “The house of God is covered with a black robe from above to be draped, surrounded by a ring of lamps, the unaccustomed hour and the stillness of the night; and our guide, who was speaking before us as if he were inspired, all these images formed an amazing image that will not be erased from my memory.”
He remained in the city, living among noblemen and aristocrats. The governor of Makkah even asked him to help clean the Kaaba. Describing one of the many incredible sights that he witnessed, during a year when the number of pilgrims was 83,000, Al-Abbasi wrote: “Only in Arafat can one get an idea of the majestic scene of pilgrimage. There are countless people from all nations and colors from every corner of the world. Despite the thousands of countless dangers and obstacles that they had to overcome, all of them worship one God. Everyone counts themselves as members of one family. There is no intermediary between man and his Lord; everyone is equal before their creator.”
Al-Abbasi, who later wrote of his experiences, was the first European to present to the world a detailed account of Makkah, unlike the fragmented notes of earlier travelers such as Ludovico di Varthema and Joseph Bates. He went so far as to include a precise location, determined through astronomical observation, and recreated a map of the Grand Mosque.
Al-Abbasi continued to travel, visiting many countries before he died of dysentery in 1818, in Aleppo, Syria. He was buried in Balqa, near Amman, the capital of Jordan.