Nancy Ajram joins International Women’s Day celebrations

Nancy Ajram posted a tweet praising women on the occasion of the International Women’s Day. (Photo courtesy: Social media)
Updated 08 March 2018
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Nancy Ajram joins International Women’s Day celebrations

JEDDAH: The celebrated Lebanese singer Nancy Ajram joined in the celebrations of International Women’s Day with a tweet for the occasion.
The singer, who has sold more than 2 million albums and is ranked among the top three best-selling Arab female artists, tweeted a picture praising “strong, compassionate, beautiful, unique, powerful and ambitious women.”
The 34-year-old singer’s fans joined her in celebrating the occasion, with many praising her success and beauty, according to media reports.
Twitter user @SaraAASaleh replied, saying: “Happy women’s day to the strongest, unique and most successful woman who brought happiness to my life and made me smile everyday and still.”
Another user, @braaa2000, said: “You are the most beautiful woman I have ever seen ... I love you very much.”
The popular singer has released 11 studio albums (including two dedicated to children), two live albums, one compilation album, two reissues and 48 singles and has appeared in many music videos and commercials.
With her popularity across the Arab world, she also serves as a goodwill ambassador for UNICEF and is considered one of the most influential personalities in the Middle East.


Classical piano soothes old elephants at Thai sanctuary

British volunteer Paul Barton plays piano for sick, abused, retired and rescued elephants in sanctuary along Thailand-Myanmar border in Kanchanaburi, Thailand, December 9, 2018. (REUTERS)
Updated 14 December 2018
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Classical piano soothes old elephants at Thai sanctuary

  • At another music session, several elephants seemed to move their heads and move about in front of the piano as the notes flowed

KANCHANABURI, Thailand: Lam Duan, a 65-year-old, blind Thai elephant is enjoying her lunch, listening to Silent Night being played on a piano.
For eight years, pachyderms like Lam Duan — old, overworked and sometimes disabled — have been rehabilitated with music at Elephants World, a retirement sanctuary for the animals in the western Thai province of Kanchanaburi.
Almost 80 percent of about 3,000 elephants at tourist venues in Thailand, Cambodia, India, Laos, Nepal and Sri Lanka, endure poor living conditions and diets and are overworked, according to the animal welfare group World Animal Protection.
The animals at Elephants World get good food and treatment for their physical ailments, but the music is an extra, special treat they appear to love.
Several times a week, British classical pianist Paul Barton, 57, sets up a piano against a backdrop of forested slopes and plays for his four-legged friends.
“Maybe some of these blind elephants get a little bit of comfort from hearing pieces of soothing classical music occasionally,” says Barton, who studied at London’s Royal Academy of Arts.
Lam Duan approached Barton as he began to play and she appeared to calm down and focus on the music.
At another music session, several elephants seemed to move their heads and move about in front of the piano as the notes flowed.
The owner of the sanctuary, Samart Prasithpol, 44, said the music seemed to provide the elephants with some special comfort.
“We work here to rehabilitate the elephants physically,” Smart told Reuters.
“The use of music has been useful in rehabilitating their soul,” he said.