French foreign minister quits ‘ailing Socialists’

French Foreign Affairs Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian announced on March 8, 2018 that he is leaving the French socialist party. (AFP / LUDOVIC MARIN)
Updated 09 March 2018
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French foreign minister quits ‘ailing Socialists’

PARIS: France’s ailing Socialist Party lost another heavyweight on Thursday after Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian announced he was quitting the party which was chased from power last year by centrist President Emmanuel Macron.
Le Drian’s membership of the party had come into question in recent days.
A number of senior Socialists had called on the 70-year-old political veteran to choose between the opposition benches and the government.
Le Drian, who served as defense minister under former Socialist President Francois Hollande before switching his loyalties to Macron, told Cnews television he had heard their calls.
“I am leaving the Socialist Party with a great deal of emotion, as a member for 44 years, and also with a lot of pride, having been involved in the campaigns of (former president) Francois Mitterrand, (former premier) Lionel Jospin and Francois Hollande with whom I am still close friends,” he said.
Le Drian’s departure is another blow to one of France’s oldest parties which voters deserted en masse last year after five years of lacklustre rule by the unpopular Hollande.
Le Drian faulted the party for what he called a “sectarian, sterile” approach in failing to back Macron for president over the Socialists’ own leftist candidate, contrasting their stance with that of Germany’s Social Democrats who have agreed to form another coalition with Chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservatives.
He however ruled out joining Macron’s Republic on the Move (LREM) party, which has attracted a slew of defectors from both the Socialists and right-wing Republicans.
His announcement came a day after four candidates for the leadership of the Socialists faced off in a TV debate.


Xi says China must lead way in reform of global governance

Updated 47 min 22 sec ago
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Xi says China must lead way in reform of global governance

  • China has sought a greater say in global organizations in line with its growing economic and diplomatic clout
  • Beijing has cast itself a responsible member of the international community

BEIJING: China must lead the way in reforming global governance, the foreign ministry on Saturday cited President Xi Jinping as saying, as Beijing looks to increase its world influence.
China has sought a greater say in global organizations such as the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and United Nations, in line with its growing economic and diplomatic clout.
Since taking office in late 2012, Xi has taken a more muscular approach, setting up China’s own global bodies like the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank and launching his landmark Belt and Road project to build a new Silk Road.
Beijing has cast itself a responsible member of the international community, especially as President Donald Trump withdraws the United States from agreements on climate change and Iran, and as Europe wrestles with Brexit and other issues.
China must “uphold the protection of the country’s sovereignty, security and development interests, proactively participate in and show the way in reform of the global governance system, creating an even better web of global partnership relationships,” Xi said in comments reported at the end of a two-day high-level Communist Party meeting.
This would help create conditions for building a modern, strong socialist country, the ministry cited him as saying at the meeting attended by officials from the foreign and commerce ministries, the military, the propaganda department and the Chinese embassy in the United States.
While Xi did not provide details, the statement cited him as mentioning the importance of the Belt and Road, and other key diplomatic platforms like his “community of common destiny,” a lofty concept meant to guide China’s relations with the world.
This proposes a “new style” of international relations is proposed that is “win-win” and of “mutual benefit” for all, but many Western nations remain critical of China’s behavior over issues such as the contested waters of the South China Sea.
Xi added that China must strengthen its relations with developing nations, who he described as natural allies, but also learn from all other nations.
He made no direct mention of issues like the trade dispute between China and the United States, North Korea, or self-ruled Taiwan, claimed by Beijing as its own and considered China’s most sensitive territorial and diplomatic issue.